20-30 Club World War II Memorial Plaque

During the Twentieth Annual “Victory” Convention, August 19 – 25, 1946 in Sacramento, California a memorial plaque was reveled.

On Wednesday, August 21st, represented the opening Plenary Session in the State Assembly Chambers. The location of this gather was particularly convenient and appropriate. The sea of delegate’s serious faces silently announced to the leaders in the rostrum that they were ready for business and prepared to map the year’s future. National President Jim Vernetti presided and after “America” and the Pledge to the Flag, Past National President Abbe Strunck of San Antonio, Texas, gave the invocation. Committee and officer reports followed until the time had arrived for the Period of Remembrance for the 20-30ians who had given their lives in World War II. The audience consisted principally of delegates and officials with a few 20-30ians and visitors who had realized such a ceremony was to take place. In view of the program which followed, absolutely every person in attendance at the convention should have been present because without having witnessed the Period of Remembrance they returned to their homes without the memory of something which would never leave them. The celebrated Convention Bureau Stringed Ensemble with its women’s choir augmented the solemnly conducted ceremony consisting of Invocation, Unveiling of the Memorial, reading of the names of the casualties, the Eulogy and “Lest We Forget”. The Creation Hymn, Green Cathedral, Lord’s Prayer, My Buddy, and Day is Done, was sung in the soft clear tones of bells tolling in the distance. Only the light tap of the gavel opened the half-hour period, and only “Taps” and another light touch of the gavel closed it. The assembly slowly wended its way out, speechless and silent in reverence of that which had just been witnessed.

(Twenty-Thirtian, October 1946, pp11-12)

In Memoriam

As listed in January 1946 issue.
The Association of 20-30 Clubs, permanent War Memorial plaque with the names of war casualties inscribed thereon.
54 clubs reported 75 casualties.

Rank – Name – Location – Club Number

  • T/Sgt. Jesse W. Andrew – Alice #239
  • Lt. Robert M. Arthur – Corpus Christi #199
  • Lt. Herb Baker – Sacramento #1
  • Sgt. Robert E. Baly – El Centro #115
  • CM 2/c William E. Bates – Beaumont #185
  • Joe Bates – Fresno #12
  • 2nd Lt. Mayo Bills – Houston #192
  • Joseph H. Boyle – Madera #160
  • Capt. Frank D. Bradford – Fresno #12
  • Lt. (j.g.) Donald R. Brown – Healdsburg #215
  • 1st Lt. Loren Bubar – San Luis Obispo #93
  • Lt. Wilmer L. Buzan – Corona #26
  • Lawrence Chenoweth, Jt. – Bakersfield #27
  • Pvt. Kenneth Cole – Flagstaff #142
  • Chf. Pharm. Nick Colabella – Santa Rosa #50
  • SC/2 Edwin J. Cook – Redding #143
  • Pfc. Woodrow Cornett – S.W. Los Angeles #206
  • Joe DeClark – S.W. Los Angeles #206
  • Duray Dorsey – San Bernardino #3
  • Lt. Ernest Emery – Kingman #157
  • Pfc. John W.R. Engholm – Gallup #180
  • Maj. John Evans – Seattle #215
  • Lt. Pierre Ferran – Napa #57
  • Claude Fleming – Carlsbad #202
  • Lt. James Fowler – Santa Barbara #42
  • Warren Feeland – Bakersfield #27
  • Robert Fulton – Idaho Falls #114
  • Robert Gardner – Patterson #91
  • Lt. Daniel H. Gatti – Westwood #200
  • Lt. Waldorf George – Pomona #9
  • Lt. S. Kenneth Graff – Alhambra #117
  • 1st Lt. Edward Hampton – Taft #77
  • 2nd Lt. O.W. Handy – Riverside #10
  • S/Sgt. Norbert Hans – Redding #143
  • Sgt. Preston Harris – Corpus Christi #199
  • 1st Lt. William L. Hart, Jr. – Kingman #157
  • Lt. John H. Hartsfield – Gallup #180
  • Charles Heller – San Antonio #167
  • 1st Lt. George B. Herbert – Houston #192
  • Corp. William L. Hoyt – Ontario #13
  • Lt. George Hudnutt, Jr. – Sacramento #1
  • Edward J. Jacobs – Flagstaff #142
  • S 1/c Arthur F. Johnsen – Huntington Park #16
  • Lt. Leonard A. Johnson – Corpus Christi #199
  • Lt. George Jones – Sacramento #1
  • Dave Kaufman – San Antonio #167
  • Lt. A.S. Kidd – Santa Monica #233
  • Ernest Krohnert – Mt. Shasta #203
  • Ens. William Laws – Santa Rosa #50
  • Lt. Robert T. Marquess – Carlsbad #202
  • 1st Lt. Pike B. Martin, Jr – Fresno #12
  • Lt. Admiral McDonald – San Antonio #167
  • Maynard Melmick – Van Nuys #207
  • Lt. Byron Michaelson – Huntington Park #16
  • George Moore – Artesia #231
  • Capt. John Mulvaney, Jr. – Alameda #183
  • Sgt. Floyd Oehlerking – Long Beach #29
  • Lt. Frederick H. Palmer – Palo Alto #25
  • Pfc. Sanator J. Passarino – Healdsburg #205
  • Pfc. Clifford E. Patton – San Francisco-Park Presidio #246
  • Lt. William H. Paulsen, Jr. – Salinas #44
  • Ivan Richardson – Bakersfield #27
  • Richard Riley, M.D. – Albuquerque #103
  • Lt. Glen Salisbury – Idaho Falls #114
  • Harry Schellhase – San Antonio #167
  • Lee J. Shudde – Houston #192
  • Rm 1/c David Solari – Chowchilla #249
  • Pvt. Joseph Spina – Los Banos #108
  • Lt. Jack R. Stewart – San Antonio #167
  • Corp. Garth B. Tillotsen – Ogden #179
  • Pfc. Marshall Weimer – Napa #57
  • Lt. Stanley Wells – Wilmington #177
  • Charles Wiese – Patterson #91
  • Lt. Jack Wiles, Jr. – Burbank #127
  • Lt. (j.g.) David Wright – Sacramento #1

As listed in May 1946 issue.
Additional war casualties have been reported to the Association of 20-30 Clubs. Following names will be added to the plaque.

Rank – Name – Location – Club Number

  • Foster Beal – Clovis #225
  • Bud Edwards – Highland Park #226
  • Lt. Jack Hodgins – Santa Barbara #42
  • Bob Jensen – Highland Park #226
  • RM 3/c Howard Keffer – Brawley #150
  • Bob Maxon – Highland Park #226
  • Lt. Col. Herbert Mills – El Paso #96
  • Ray McGinley – Santa Ana #22
  • Lt. Don Riley Powell – Fallon #40
  • 2d. Lt. Bert Ross – Santa Rosa #50
  • Carl Schreider – Clovis #225
  • Dr. H.J. Seyfarth – Turlock #68
  • John Shield – Clovis #225
  • S/Sgt. John C. Walden – El Paso #96

 

THE MAGAZINE (or evolution of)

I’ve been wanting to share a little of the evolution of the Active 20-30 publication. These right now are just the magazine covers of the changes through the years. I’m hoping to dig deeper and find articles within talking about the changes. As you will see; as the organization’s name changes and two groups merge, so did their magazines.

Active 20-30 Club, United States and Canada association has in their current bylaws a section for our official publication.

Article XII [Official Publication]
Section 1. Publication and Title: The association shall publish, or cause to be published under its control, a periodical under the official title of “Active Twenty-Thirtian

There are a couple more sections detailing the editorial staff, subscriptions, and club correspondents. I am not highlighting those areas at the moment so we’ll leave them be.The first couple of the 20-30 magazines were more like bulletins of clubs and events and what occurred. This was the first cover for the Association of 20-30 Clubs (1927).  Recap: this is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Sacramento, California.This is the first cover for the Active Club (1928) Recap: This is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Aberdeen, Washington.Next, we have the magazine cover when 20-30 International and Active International merged together into one organization (1960s).Lastly, a couple more when they became smaller publications after International split into different national association groups. These represent the United States and Canada’s magazine. Couldn’t find any International ones at the time of this posting.

The First 5 Conventions of 20-30

Here’s a little tidbit from the 20-30 history files

The first year the Association of 20-30 Clubs (as the Active 20-30 was then known) started having convention meetings was December 11, 1926 in Sacramento, California. About 15 members from 7 clubs attended. At that meeting, they approved and welcomed the 8th club into the Association, which was Reno, Nevada. The first club formed out of the state of California.

1927 had 3 more convention meetings held for the Association of 20-30 clubs to get together and members could have a merry time and approve more clubs into it’s organization. Here’s a brief note of those conventions:

April 9-10, 1927 – Second convention meeting held in San Bernardino, California

– Resolution was introduced by San Bernardino which proposed the division of the member clubs into district groups.

– Standard Constitution for member clubs was adopted

August 13-14, 1927 – Third convention meeting held in Reno, Nevada

– Changes made in the Association’s constitution and By-Laws, a brief outline of which follows: New delegates will be elected and will meet on the second Saturday of next December. Thereafter an annual convention will be held between the 15th of August and the 15th of September each year. The elected officers of the Association will be a President, Vice-President, and Secretary-Treasurer. Immediately after his election, the President shall divide the territory embraced by the Association into districts and shall appoint a District Governor to supervise club activities in each district, they to serve at the pleasure of the President.

– The Twenty-Thirtian was authorized as the official publication of the Association, with Ed Cain appointed as Editor. It will be published monthly and one copy will be sent to each club for each active member on its rolls.

December 10, 1927 – Fourth convention meeting held in Fresno, California

– By the time of this convention meeting, 18 clubs had been formed and accepted into the organization. And about 100 members attended this convention. Quite a difference from the 15 at the first one.

August 1928 – Fifth convention meeting held in Stockton, California

Bob Hope Entertains Banning

by Don “Louie” Keele

An Tuesday night, February 24, millions of listeners throughout the North American continent and probably some overseas, heard about Banning and its 20-30 Club. Bob Hope brought his program to Banning to help our club secure money for its Building Fund.

In addition to his regular broadcast, Bob did a special hour show after leaving the air. Vera Vague, Jerry Colona, guest star Clifton Webb and announcer Wendell Niles were the principal performers. Les Brown and his orchestra were generous with their fine music.

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President Milton Callopy presented the comedian with a blue and grey western shirt bearing the inscription “Healthy Baskers” in gold lettering. This is the name our club is known by.

Bob Hope made presentations of gold football trophies to the outstanding football players of the Banning High School football squad of 1947 on behalf of our club.

Community leaders have expressed their appreciation of the work of our club in bringing the Hope show to Banning, and stated it was one of the best publicity features the community has ever had. Every seat in the auditorium was occupied and the entire event was outstanding.

When Pauls and Founders meet (20-30 & Rotary)

Fun find: “When Pauls and Founders meet. It was a moment mutually enjoyed when Rotary International’s incoming Governor Paul Claiborne, left, of Auburn, California, met Rotary’s Founder Paul Harris, and told him the idea for the 20-30 Clubs came to him at a Rotary Luncheon. Governor Claiborne organized the first of these young men’s clubs nineteen years ago.
(Twenty-Thirtian magazine, year 1941)

Happy 95th Anniversary to the Active 20-30 Club Sacramento #1

Every year, we raise our glasses all around the world to celebrate Sacramento #1’s anniversary and the beginning of Active 20-30 International. I would ask for stories, memories, and photos of people’s time in the organization.

Back in December 2012, we celebrated turning 90 years. I came across a post from Robert Allen who is a past active of Sacramento #1. It continues to be a wonderful memory that I want to re-share five years later. Cheers!!

Happy 90th birthday to the Active 20-30 Club Sacramento #1. It is……very simply……the greatest service organization in the world!!! President Richard Nixon, Congressman Robert Matsui, Senator Barry Goldwater, Governor Pete Wilson and hundreds of the most influential businessmen in the Sacramento Region have been members of the Active 20-30 Club. The club was founded here in Sacramento and has since grown worldwide helping young people come together for leadership development, personal growth and friendship. All while helping the children in their respective communities! I am a PROUD past active member of the organization and am very humble to be part of it over the years!

I still think many people in the community have no idea what we do. A singles group…….a networking organization? Really?? So far from the truth. Our “hands on” events focus on having 20-30 members actually spend time with and help underprivileged or disadvantaged kids in the area. Our events range from our annual Michael Smythe Cancer Kids Party to the Back to School and Holiday Shopping Sprees that give us the opportunity to buy clothing and toys for children in need. Don’t get me wrong. We throw a great party and have thrown many of them to raise millions of dollars. Just so you know……100%…..that is 100% of proceeds go to charity!!!!! Nothing goes to anyone in the club. Listen to these numbers. In Sacramento Club #1 alone there have been thousands of men, that have raised millions of dollars, helping tens of thousands of children, assisting hundreds of non-profits and volunteering hundreds of thousands (maybe millions) of man hours!!! Just in Sacramento.

The most moving event for me was a few years ago at the Mike Smythe Cancer Kids Party. Sitting on plastic chairs, face to face with a girl that was about 7 and fighting cancer. Her parents and healthy sister watched from across the room while eating pizza. I was painting a snowflake on her cheek. I am NOT an artist. My buddy Robb W. in the club is a pro at this, but not me. I held her chin with my left hand and painted with my right. We talked about Christmas, her family, her medical staff and school. Her face was not far from mine and we talked eye to eye as I tried to paint. She was a beautiful little girl and wearing a blonde wig. At one point I told her that “her hair” was beautiful (and winked)…just letting her know I knew it was a wig. The party wasn’t over, but my painting was complete. As her parents walked over I said something like, “You are a special girl. Have a Merry Christmas and YOU ARE A BEAUTIFUL GIRL whether you have hair or not.” …and I smiled! I am not sure if it was the right thing to say or not……she is not my daughter……I only met her that day. I went on to my next attempt at face painting. Later when it was close to the end of the party a man’s voice gave a little shout across the room….”Rob!” I turned to look and there she was with her family waving as they walked out the door……..HER DAD RUBBING HER BALD HEAD AND SMILING!

Our motto is timeless and is as true today as it was 90 years ago! “One never stands so tall as when kneeling to help a child.”….or in my case painting a snowflake on a child’s cheek.

Here is to another 95 years!

Portland Makes Frank Sinatra Honorary Member

Climax to all membership drive efforts in 1947 for the Portland, Oregon 20-30 Club was the pinning of a 20-30 button on singer Frank Sinatra.  President Bill Thelin made the presentation to the popular radio and screen star at the huge PAL benefit show, stage at Portland’s International Exposition building.

Appearing in Portland for the first time, Sinatra headlined a large group of Hollywood stars that included Edward Arnold, Jack Paar, Eddy Peabody and singer Nora Martin.  In close cooperation with other civic groups, Portland Twenty-Thirtians helped to sponsor the first PAL charity performance, designed to raise funds for PAL, Inc. a public youth building program set up to fight juvenile delinquency.

When appeals for public help failed, Twenty-Thirtians pounded pavement distributing posters; handled the multitude of details necessary to publish a printed program from advertising sales to the vending.  A speaker’s bureau was set up from which fast-on-their-feet speakers carried the story of PAL and publicized its purposes to countless community groups.

by Dick Johnson

The Twenty-Thirtian. February 1948. Volume XXII, Number V.