THE MAGAZINE (or evolution of)

I’ve been wanting to share a little of the evolution of the Active 20-30 publication. These right now are just the magazine covers of the changes through the years. I’m hoping to dig deeper and find articles within talking about the changes. As you will see; as the organization’s name changes and two groups merge, so did their magazines.

Active 20-30 Club, United States and Canada association has in their current bylaws a section for our official publication.

Article XII [Official Publication]
Section 1. Publication and Title: The association shall publish, or cause to be published under its control, a periodical under the official title of “Active Twenty-Thirtian

There are a couple more sections detailing the editorial staff, subscriptions, and club correspondents. I am not highlighting those areas at the moment so we’ll leave them be.The first couple of the 20-30 magazines were more like bulletins of clubs and events and what occurred. This was the first cover for the Association of 20-30 Clubs (1927).  Recap: this is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Sacramento, California.This is the first cover for the Active Club (1928) Recap: This is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Aberdeen, Washington.Next, we have the magazine cover when 20-30 International and Active International merged together into one organization (1960s).Lastly, a couple more when they became smaller publications after International split into different national association groups. These represent the United States and Canada’s magazine. Couldn’t find any International ones at the time of this posting.

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When Pauls and Founders meet (20-30 & Rotary)

Fun find: “When Pauls and Founders meet. It was a moment mutually enjoyed when Rotary International’s incoming Governor Paul Claiborne, left, of Auburn, California, met Rotary’s Founder Paul Harris, and told him the idea for the 20-30 Clubs came to him at a Rotary Luncheon. Governor Claiborne organized the first of these young men’s clubs nineteen years ago.
(Twenty-Thirtian magazine, year 1941)

Women in Active 20-30

In an effort to bring our association into conformity with the public accommodation laws of the State of California and other states, and in light of last summer’s Supreme Court decision mandating the admission of women in Rotary Clubs and subsequent decisions by other mainstream service clubs, such as Lions, Kiwanis, and Jaycees, to allow women as members, your elected National Board has prepared a proposed change in our constitution and bylaws allowing for qualified women to apply for membership in Active 20-30. Our National Association is incorporated, along with Active 20-30 International, in the State of California. While our constitution is technically in violation of these public accommodation laws and subject to scrutiny by the Franchise Tax Board of California, we have not yet been challenged by this taxing authority, also, to date, our constitutional provisions for membership as expressly male-only, has not been challenged by court action or lawsuit, which could definitively determine whether Active 20-30, is in fact, more private and social than public and whether finite and strict membership guidelines are universally and uniformly applied, to protect our male-only status and U.S. constitutional rights. It’s been argued that perhaps, if challenged in court, we could delay a decision for a few years through the legal and appeals process. However, this action would exact a cost, in potential legal fees, and resultant reduction or loss of membership services, the potential loss of our tax status, unfavorable press, and create a divisive issue for our clubs with the possible loss of some dedicated members or clubs.

What effect will this proposed amendment to our constitution have on our association’s membership in Active 20-30/International and in WOCO? The officers of Active 20-30/International are cognizant of our situation and are confident that we will act in a manner which is responsible and prudent in the face of federal and state law regarding this issue.

Active 20-30/International is also incorporated under the laws of the State of California. Also, it is inherent in our international bylaws, that a National association not operate in the direct or indirect conflict with the “laws of the land”. Inquiry on the impact of women in our association in relation to our membership in WOCO was requested. The response was that the WOCO Board and/or a WOCO AGM would not act until needing to do so. We will draft appropriate bylaws amendments for WOCO and International to explicitly provide for the admission of women into an association where its been determined to be the correct action with regards to this sort of legislation or binding rulings by the courts. At this point, we presume that the ratification of this amendment at our next annual general meeting (AGM), during the convention in Phoenix, will not jeopardize our status in WOCO or International.

How will this change affect our clubs and auxiliaries? First, it should be noted that the amendment does not require all of our member clubs to begin admitting women. It provides for women to apply for membership, and be granted membership if qualified, in those states with equal accommodation statutes, such as California, your club will want to check with your state’s agency or authority to verify the existence of these types of laws. (Headquarters staff is presently researching this as well.) We also recommend that your club re-examine your specific membership guidelines to ensure the uniform application of these criteria for prospective members. This action could help prevent local potential legal entanglements with regards to new member applications by women, as well as men. In the states where these laws currently don’t exist, clubs are not mandated to accept applications from women or to grant membership to them. It is the local clubs choice in this case. However, it is incumbent upon the local club officers to be aware of specific local legislation or ruling before acting.

Women’s auxiliary clubs can continue to function as they have previously. No amendments have been proposed, to date, to alter their status. However, these clubs may make formal application for an Active 20-30 club charter. As with all charter applications, the chartering process and procedures must be met prior to approval by the National Board and of course, assuming this amendment is passed by our AGM.

The National President and officers urge you to consider and discuss this issue in your own club and to temper your discourse and judgement in light of the realities we face. Ample opportunity to further discuss this amendment at the upcoming Regional and National meetings will be available, prior to the formal vote, in Phoenix. This vote will cast the immediate and long term future of Active 20-30. The National Board recommends that your club votes in favor of the amendment in its current form, as the best solution to this issue.

“Women in Active 20-30”. The Active Twenty-Thirtian, May 1988, p3.

National Project: Back to School Shopping Spree Origins

Other 20-30 Club national projects:
Universal Fingerprinting
Safety Sallys (putting up warning signs at school’s crosswalks)

Curious to know about when clubs started shopping sprees? Or maybe just wanting to know when it became our current United States National Project?

Members from Sacramento #1 visited the re-chartered Stockton Club around 1974. That club was hosting a back to school shopping spree. They thought it a great idea and brought it back to Sacramento, where a back to school spree happened around 1980.*

More and more clubs starting holding their own shopping sprees and when a new National Project committee was formed in 1993, they ended up deciding on having this be the one that they felt clubs would get behind.

Kevin Thompson from Torrance, California “ran for National President on the campaign of a National Project. My campaign speech included … “I have a dream that on the same day, every year, thousands of Active 20-30 members together with thousands of needy children and their families will gather with the purpose of obtaining new clothes and supplies to return to school.” The vision was to create a united cause as previously Active 20-30 did not have a united National project.” He became the National President in the 1994-1995 term and got to work on making his goal a reality. He hoped to reach out to stores like Mervyn’s or Target and get a corporate deal for across the U.S.**

Back-to-School Shopping Spree

The National Project Committee met with Jan O’Laughlan, Community Projects/Public Affairs Manager, Mervyn’s, and established Saturday, August 3rd as the Active 20-30 Back-to-School Shopping Spree. This will be in concert with Mervyn’s fifth Annual ChildSpree.

With your club’s involvement and all of our clubs across the country, it is our hope to provide clothing and school supplies to over 1500 needy children on this very special day.

It has been a three year endeavor to find a project that all of our clubs could participate in no matter what size the club or how much money the club decided to spend on the project.

The National Office has a sample letter that can be used to send to your local Mervyn’s store as well as “Child Release Form” and a sample set up sheet to give you an idea on how the project should be run.

Each Mervyn’s store has available $1500 matching funds for this purpose. Mervyn’s has requested that each Active 20-30 Club contact the local store to submit a request for these matching funds. While there may be a competing non-profit agency also requesting the allocated funds, Mervyn’s is very aware of our national effort and it would therefor behoove us to submit our requests as soon as possible.

Upon receipt of the club’s request and approval of the $1500 matching funds, Mervyn’s will also provide a very detailed “How-to-Kit” to augment what you will receive from the National Office. Mervyn’s will additionally provide a 10% discount for Active 20-30 the day of the event as well as any sales or special promotions that may be going on.

It is the hope of your National Board of Directors that all of our clubs will participate in this worthwhile National project. However, we know it takes time for new projects to get incorporated into a club’s schedule. But certainly for those clubs who can’t participate this year, they will be able to join the others clubs in 1997.***

August 1960, 20-30 Club President’s Message

The President’s Message

By Clint McClure

The DATE of August 1, 1960 will be remembered as the most significant in our history since the founding of 20-30, for on that day the merger of Active and 20-30 International became a reality. Both groups will retain their present administrative structures until the joint International convention in Tucson next summer, but for all other intents and purposes we are now one combine organization.

I was most fortunate in being able to attend the Active International Convention in Calgary, Alberta last month, and to see the Active delegates unanimously vote to merge with 20-30. Every International officer making a report to the convention recommended the merger, and the enthusiasm for it displayed by the delegates and members was outstanding.

Had I not seen the Active banners and badges, I would have been sure that I was attending a 20-30 convention. Their methods of operating are identical with ours, and the Active spirit is almost unbelievable. It will be a wonderful experience associating with them in Tucson and for many years thereafter.

The most impressive program Active has is that of public speaking. It has often been said that many men have excellent ideas, but they die without seeing the light of day because few men are able to express themselves. This is the core of the Active program, and through a series of contests on the local, district and International level, Activians are given a thorough schooling in this self-betterment technique.

There are many other practices and procedures in Active that will certainly benefit our combined organization. In order to realize these benefits, we must begin now to think Active 20-30, work Active 20-30, talk Active 20-30 and be Active 20-30!

Clint McClure. “The President’s Message.” The Twenty-Thirtian, August 1960, p4.

PROJECT: A Gathering of Eagles

eagles-03Pssst … Buddy, ya wanna buy an eagle? Rent one? How about a long term loan?

This is what the US Department of Interior offered the Sacramento City Zoo; a permanent loan of several pairs of Golden Eagles, provided an appropriate display area be created. And that’s when the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento go involved.

A year ago (May ’73) Bill Meeker, a Director of the city zoo, was invited to speak before the Sacramento club on “What’s New At The Zoo?” After hearing about the development of the zoo into one of the most formidable for a community the size of Sacramento, and about Meeker’s plans for future zoo development, he was invited to make a presentation before the club’s Projects and Charities Committee.

Meeker advised the P/C Committee that in order to keep pace with other similar zoos, and in order to maintain public interest and attendance, a new exhibit should be developed every one or two years. Meeker added that there were no funds available for expansion. He therefore envisioned his best source for zoo expansion would be through the Sacramento area’s service clubs. He felt that if one major club, such as Active 20-30, would provide the first new exhibit, this would be the initiative for other service clubs to build additional new exhibits.

Meeker introduced his plans to expand the zoo with a new ornithology area to include many new aviary exhibits. The first being the new eagle aerie for our national bird. He showed the P/C Committee an illustration of a new eagle display shaped like a giant canary cage and said the cost would be approximately $1,500.00 for material and construction. The committee suggested the plan ought to be revised to a larger more natural exhibit with high rock formations, trees, etc. Meeker thought this was a great idea but too expensive since it would boost the cost to around $20,000.00.

Nevertheless, the Sacramento club believed they could build such a cage, using the resources available through its own members, and voted to go ahead with the project.

eagles-01

After the zoo provided the basic design, several engineers from the club determined what the structural requirements would be and their approximate costs. They estimated if the club could obtain the majority of the materials by donations from the community, the cost could be kept within $2,000.00 … including food and beer. After this, several club members in the construction industry determined the time and manpower requirements. They estimated ten to fifteen members working on the project for five or six weekends would complete the entire job.

An “Eagle Cage Committee” was formed with two co-chairmen: Steve Whichard, who is a partner in Whichard Construction, to provide the expertise and round up materials; and Ned Strong, from the mortgage business, to provide manpower.

The exhibit was planned to include a 25-foot high heavy-gauge screened area which could best be framed with telephone poles. The then-president of the Sacramento club (ahem) just happened to be employed by Pacific Telephone and was able to obtain enough poles for the exhibit, which the telephone company also placed. Through members in the construction industry, cement for the foundation, lumber, nails, metal eagles-02doors for the building, and many other materials were provided. Another major construction item was the framing and gunnite material to create the rock-mountain structure. Steve Whichard was able to have all of the material, as well as its construction, donated by the Northern California Lethe and Plaster Contractors Association. This, obviously saved the club several thousand dollars. All other labor, in addition to tools such as forklifts, power equipment, hammers and pliers, was provided by club members.

The cage took seven working weekends to complete, starting last October and ending in April. Dedication will be May 23, 1974.

Sacramento City Zoo now has a new eagle aerie at no cost to the city, valued at $20,000.00, because of the initiative, imagination and effective use of resources of the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento.

Hefflefinger, Dean. “A Gathering of Eagles.” Active 20-30. April/May 1974: 12-13. Print.

eagles