THE MAGAZINE (or evolution of)

I’ve been wanting to share a little of the evolution of the Active 20-30 publication. These right now are just the magazine covers of the changes through the years. I’m hoping to dig deeper and find articles within talking about the changes. As you will see; as the organization’s name changes and two groups merge, so did their magazines.

Active 20-30 Club, United States and Canada association has in their current bylaws a section for our official publication.

Article XII [Official Publication]
Section 1. Publication and Title: The association shall publish, or cause to be published under its control, a periodical under the official title of “Active Twenty-Thirtian

There are a couple more sections detailing the editorial staff, subscriptions, and club correspondents. I am not highlighting those areas at the moment so we’ll leave them be.The first couple of the 20-30 magazines were more like bulletins of clubs and events and what occurred. This was the first cover for the Association of 20-30 Clubs (1927).  Recap: this is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Sacramento, California.This is the first cover for the Active Club (1928) Recap: This is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Aberdeen, Washington.Next, we have the magazine cover when 20-30 International and Active International merged together into one organization (1960s).Lastly, a couple more when they became smaller publications after International split into different national association groups. These represent the United States and Canada’s magazine. Couldn’t find any International ones at the time of this posting.

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Active International: A Brief Outline Covering First Years in History

By Carl C Springer
Founder of the Active Club

The first meeting of the Active Club was heald at the Sweet Shop in Aberdeen, Wash., on February 10, 1922. Those present were Paul Arthaud, Ernest Axland, Cal Teman, Pat McNamara, Edgar Jones, and Carl Springer. The latter was named temporary chairman and Ernest Axland temporary secretary.

At the second session in the Washington Hotel of the same city the same group was present along with Carl Morck, Clarence George, Tom O’Hara, Earl Woodland, Gordon Tebb, FK Green, LA Aldrich, Vard Steiglitz, Carl Weathrwax Jr., Dr. Harry Tyo and Frank Partridge. A constitution and by-laws committee was appointed.

The third session was held at the same place. At this time the constitution and by-laws were adopted and the following officers were elected: EC Axland, chairman; Carl C Springer, timekeeper. Several names were presented for an appropriate title for the organization and Carl Morck proposed the word “Active” which was adopted on motion.

Meetings were continued in the same manner until the constitution and by-laws were revised on Jan. 3, 1924. At this time the former titles were dropped in recognition of president, vice-president, and secretary. Carl Springer was named president of the club; Charles J Kalb, vice-president, and Arthur J Spacek, secretary. The constitution recognizing the organization as a national was filed with the secretary of the state on August 20, 1924.

The group was incorporated under the laws of Washington. Hoquiam group No. 2 was granted a charter presented by Herbert Wilson, president of the Aberdeen Club. Montesano became No. 3 as chartered by the present international treasurer, Ed Nattrass, who was the vice-president of the Aberdeen Active Club.

Soon after Elma became No. 4 and Olympia No. 5. During the early days in the organization several activities were entered into by the Aberdeen group. They sponsored joint banquets with the other service clubs and the Chamber of Commerce, helped in establishment of a tourist park and Boy Scout Camp, sponsored a kid’s day, and were active in Near East relief work. Many other smaller tasks were accomplished by the organization.

This includes a general outline of the Active Club up until the time of the first convention held in Montesano, 1925, when the present constitution and by-laws were adopted and new officers elected for the International. A new charter also was received from the secretary of state.

Following this time the rapid expansion of the club started. This history of the organization from this time to the present is generally know to the membership of the international.

(1927)

Sacramento Active International Convention 1947

Surprised Discovery: Not only was there a Sacramento Active Club, but they had a Convention in 1947, one year after the Sacramento 20-30 Club hosted their Convention.

I knew there were separate Active and 20-30 Clubs in California before the organizations merged, but I had no clue there were both in my hometown.Caption: “The Sacramento Convention Picture, taken in the lobby of the Hotel Senator toward the close of a highly successful convention, gives just a suggestion of the festive spirit which prevailed. In the center foreground (beside the saw) is Active’s First Lady, Irene Moore, and Bob Moore, newly installed President of Active International. A portion of the party was “elsewhere”, unfortunately, when the picture was taken. Also, apologies to those on the edges of the group who are not flattered by the “distortion””.

Happy 95th Anniversary to the Active 20-30 Club Sacramento #1

Every year, we raise our glasses all around the world to celebrate Sacramento #1’s anniversary and the beginning of Active 20-30 International. I would ask for stories, memories, and photos of people’s time in the organization.

Back in December 2012, we celebrated turning 90 years. I came across a post from Robert Allen who is a past active of Sacramento #1. It continues to be a wonderful memory that I want to re-share five years later. Cheers!!

Happy 90th birthday to the Active 20-30 Club Sacramento #1. It is……very simply……the greatest service organization in the world!!! President Richard Nixon, Congressman Robert Matsui, Senator Barry Goldwater, Governor Pete Wilson and hundreds of the most influential businessmen in the Sacramento Region have been members of the Active 20-30 Club. The club was founded here in Sacramento and has since grown worldwide helping young people come together for leadership development, personal growth and friendship. All while helping the children in their respective communities! I am a PROUD past active member of the organization and am very humble to be part of it over the years!

I still think many people in the community have no idea what we do. A singles group…….a networking organization? Really?? So far from the truth. Our “hands on” events focus on having 20-30 members actually spend time with and help underprivileged or disadvantaged kids in the area. Our events range from our annual Michael Smythe Cancer Kids Party to the Back to School and Holiday Shopping Sprees that give us the opportunity to buy clothing and toys for children in need. Don’t get me wrong. We throw a great party and have thrown many of them to raise millions of dollars. Just so you know……100%…..that is 100% of proceeds go to charity!!!!! Nothing goes to anyone in the club. Listen to these numbers. In Sacramento Club #1 alone there have been thousands of men, that have raised millions of dollars, helping tens of thousands of children, assisting hundreds of non-profits and volunteering hundreds of thousands (maybe millions) of man hours!!! Just in Sacramento.

The most moving event for me was a few years ago at the Mike Smythe Cancer Kids Party. Sitting on plastic chairs, face to face with a girl that was about 7 and fighting cancer. Her parents and healthy sister watched from across the room while eating pizza. I was painting a snowflake on her cheek. I am NOT an artist. My buddy Robb W. in the club is a pro at this, but not me. I held her chin with my left hand and painted with my right. We talked about Christmas, her family, her medical staff and school. Her face was not far from mine and we talked eye to eye as I tried to paint. She was a beautiful little girl and wearing a blonde wig. At one point I told her that “her hair” was beautiful (and winked)…just letting her know I knew it was a wig. The party wasn’t over, but my painting was complete. As her parents walked over I said something like, “You are a special girl. Have a Merry Christmas and YOU ARE A BEAUTIFUL GIRL whether you have hair or not.” …and I smiled! I am not sure if it was the right thing to say or not……she is not my daughter……I only met her that day. I went on to my next attempt at face painting. Later when it was close to the end of the party a man’s voice gave a little shout across the room….”Rob!” I turned to look and there she was with her family waving as they walked out the door……..HER DAD RUBBING HER BALD HEAD AND SMILING!

Our motto is timeless and is as true today as it was 90 years ago! “One never stands so tall as when kneeling to help a child.”….or in my case painting a snowflake on a child’s cheek.

Here is to another 95 years!

History of Active 20-30 International (part 2)

The History of Active 20-30 International

(quick recap of how two clubs merged into one)

Active 20-30 International had its actual beginnings in 1922 when young men in two widely separated communities of the United States saw the need for a service club for young men. They found that established service clubs were dominated by older men, run by older men and whose officers were invariably much older men.

This realization led those groups of ambitious young men to stray away from existing groups and organize a club of their own, a club wherein young men would have a chance to engage actively in service to their communities; a club where young ideas, backed by enthusiasm and the energy of youth, could share in civic responsibilities on an equal basis with clubs composed of older men.

These pioneers of young men’s service clubs were located in Aberdeen, Washington where Active International was formed and in Sacramento, California, where 20-30 International had its beginnings.

Both 20-30 International and Active International where chartered members of the World Council of Young Men’s Service Clubs. John Armenia, Joe Crowe and Arnie Scheldt of Active and Dr. James Vernetti, Henry Heyl and Ray Fletcher of 20-30 were among those who fostered the World Council movement up to its formal beginning in 1945.

In 1959 President Norm Morrison of 20-30 and President Ken Helling of Active exchanged a letter and renewed the long standing proposal that these two almost identical young men’s service clubs should merge.

Throughout 1959 and 1960 meetings were held between the two groups, culminating in the proposed Constitution, and resolution to be presented to the 1960 conventions of each organization.

At the 20-30 International Convention held in Santa Cruz, CA in 1960, the delegates unanimously adopted the merger proposal and the Constitution. One month later, the delegates at the Active international Convention in Calgary, Alberta, also unanimously adopted the propositions.

Therefore, on August 1, 1960, Active and 20-30 became Active 20- 30 International.

During the year of the merger, Active 20-30 had 7,500 members from 365 clubs in Canada, USA, Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador and Cuba.

The first convention of Active 20-30 International was held in Tucson, AZ, July 10-14, 1961, where the Constitution and By-Laws were officially adopted.

Jack Kummert was elected President; Federico G. Lugo as First Vice-President; James Robertson as Second Vice-President. Clint McClure and Owen Barnes, the last presidents of 20-30 and Active respectively, stayed as members of the International Directors Council as Immediate Past Presidents.

Other members of the First Council of Directors of Active 20-30 International were: Ray Manges, Area 1; Norm Jensen, Area 2; Skeet Glidewell, Area 3; Forrest K. Stewart, Area 4; Roy Stype, Area 5; Emilio Pérez-Banuet, Area 6; Joaquin Bours, Associate Director of Area 6; Angel Moreno, Area 7 and Bob Baumgartner, Area 8.

History of Active 20-30 International (part 1)

Active 20-30 International is the result of the fusion of two Clubs, Active International and 20-30 International, whose story is told below.

733938_498805500176554_1550661425_nHistory of Active International

Active International was founded in Aberdeen, Washington February, 10, 1922. A group of young men including Ernest Axland, Paul Arthand, Carl Morck, Carl Springer, Carl Teman, Edgar Jones and Pat McNamara were eager to give the young men a more active part in the affairs of the community. Thus, they formed together to establish a young men’s club which they named “Active”. They elected Ernest Axland as president.

The emblem selected for Active was the buzz saw. The buzz saw is just about the most active object you can find anywhere. Even when motionless, as it is on the emblem, it has the appearance of intense activity. Since Aberdeen was a lumber center and sawmills with humming saw blades were in evidence everywhere, it was only logical that the founders of Active chose the buzz saw for their emblem. The buzz saw represents the usefulness of intense activity and the abundant energy of responsible youth, means power, strength, and progress.

Active was incorporated under the laws of the State of Washington on August 20, 1924. Before long, Active Clubs were formed in Elma, Hoquiam, Montesano and Olympia.

In 1925 the first convention was held in Montesano, Washington with Carl Morck of Aberdeen being elected as president. In the same year, the name of the organization was officially changed from Active Club to Active Club International.

In June of 1929, the organization became international in fact, as well as in name, with the chartering of the Vancouver International Club in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Active clubs soon spread through Washington, Oregon, California and Montana in the United States and the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta in Canada. Clubs were also located in Idaho, Hawaii and Washington D.C.

The motto selected for this growing organization was: “Enthusiasm – Goodwill – Progress”.

  • Enthusiasm: “Get in” with all your heart, with spirit, interest and energy in all the activities of the Club.
  • Goodwill: Be more than fair in relations with our fellow men, bring more harmony, mutual appreciation and tolerance; be friendly, show greater concern for the welfare of others; justice and fairness in business, cooperation for mutual progress.
  • Progress: Improve health; better education and recreation, improving conditions for development and welfare of society.

The slogan used as a guide for all Active projects was “A man never stands so tall as when he kneels to help a child”.

The National Offices of Active International have been located in Aberdeen, Tacoma, Raymond and Spokane, Washington; Portland, Oregon; and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

336708_218824074841366_328015875_oHistory of 20-30 International

 20-30 International was founded in Sacramento, CA in the fall of 1922. Paul W. Claiborne was just twenty years of age when he conceived the idea of forming a service club whose members would consist of young men.

Together with Earl B. Casey, Alfred B. Franke, Charles G. McBride and Marshall A. Page, he went with his idea to Mitch Nathan, the president of the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

Nathan approved of his plan and appointed a committee to foster the formation of a club whose activities would aid the growth and advancement of young men. This committee consisted of F.A.S. “Sandy” Foale, Chairman; Charles Hansen, Clinton Harbor, Joseph Quire and Mrs. Alva Archer.

A meeting was held in the Chamber of Commerce building on Tuesday, December 12, 1922, with Judge Peter J. Shields as the speaker. It was decided to proceed with the organization work immediately. Upon the suggestion of Sandy Foale, the name 20-30 was adopted.

An organizational meeting was held on December 19, 1922, and Paul Claiborne was unanimously elected as the first president. Sandy Foale was named chairman of the advisory board. After the Sacramento club had established itself, 20-30 began to expand to new areas.

On March 10, 1924, the Stockton club was chartered with the assistance of the Rotary Club in Stockton.  G. Lewis Fox was elected president, and Dr. Hall was named Chairman of the Advisory Board.

A meeting between Sacramento and Stockton was held on March 5, 1925, and they created the 20-30 Club Executive Council to help with expansion to other cities.

On August of 1925, the third Club, San Bernardino, California becomes affiliated with the organization.

During 1926, 20-30 Clubs were formed in San Francisco, Hayward, Tracy and Oakland.

Delegates from the seven clubs met in San Francisco on August 21, 1926. This was the first convention of 20-30. A Constitution was adopted and the following officers were elected: Sumner Mering, President; Tom Louttit, Vice President; Ivan Shoemaker, Secretary/Treasurer.

From 20-30’s inception in 1922 until December 1941, charters were granted to 260 clubs and a total membership of 4,675 was attained. During the war years, approximately 65 percent of the membership served in the armed forces. This compelled 68 clubs to disband and decreased the number of active clubs to 122 with active membership at 1,800. In many cases the clubs were kept on active status by one or two members who maintained the charter.

Beginning with the chartering of the Juarez Club on February 16, 1944, these started the movement of 20-30 in Mexico and Latin America. It was a result of these charters that the name of the association was changed to 20-30 International at the 1946 Victory Convention.

In the years to follow, the organization continued to expand through the Mid West to Ohio and south of the border to Mexico, and afterwards to El Salvador, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador, Cuba and Colombia.

The emblem of 20-30 International was an hourglass, symbolizing the passage of time and the need of young man to take advantage of his time and energy for useful activities.  Around this hourglass, there were four “S”.

The four “S” have a double significance since these were the initials of the first four 20-30 Clubs (Sacramento, Stockton, San Bernardino and San Francisco) and they also conform the initials of the slogan “Sincerity in Service, our Slogan for Success”.

The motto of 20-30 International was, “Youth, to be Served, Must Serve”. Both were authored by Sandy Foale.

Sept 1960, Active Club President’s Message

Renewed Incentive

By Owen Barnes
President, Active International

The last Active International Convention we will ever have is behind us. Thanks must be given to our Calgary hosts for a most memorable and fitting Convention. Thanks, too, to all of you for allowing me the privilege of serving you this coming year.

With a last nostalgic glance at the past we embark on an exciting year of progress under the Active 20-30 banner. As of August 1, 1960, we are, by unanimous action of the delegates in Calgary, a part of Active 20-30. It is my earnest belief that the delegates at Santa Cruz and those at Calgary showed considerable wisdom in deciding upon a merger. It is a logical step enabling two service-minded groups to combine their talents and enthusiasm in order to better serve their communities and their countries.

This year we must not only condition our thinking to embrace the phrase “Active 20-30 International”, but we must also continue the vigorous programs we have already undertaken to make ours the biggest and best Area of all. To do this I hope each Club will seriously attempt to win the Master Active Club Award. A careful look at the requirements for this Award will show why I feel this way. All the requirements are designed to foster a strong, healthy, well-balanced Club. This almost makes membership increase automatic, and external expansion more than probable. I have set no specific goals of membership increase or expansion because these will take place as a by-product if all Clubs set out to win the above Award. At the same time there will be more attention placed on Public Speaking (which is vital to our self-improvement), as well as all the other facets of our service life.

It must be apparent to you that I consider success or failure as a matter solely up to the local Clubs. Actually, it can’t be otherwise. For 36 years local members, local Clubs, local Club Presidents, have decided the fate of our organization. How else could it be when this is all there is? YOU are International! Your efforts will determine when your Active 20-30 will be. International officers can only inform, suggest and guide. We cannot do your work for you.

Because of the problems of merger this year we anticipate a great deal of information will be sent out to all Presidents. This information will have to be presented at regular meetings in order to keep everyone informed. For example, by the time you read this the two Executive Committees of Active and 20-30 will have met in Eugene to work out some of the necessary details of the mechanics of merger. Such proposals as need Board ratification and a delegate vote will be presented at the combined Area VIII Convention and Mid-Winter Board Meeting in January. Details of this will be presented in full in ample time for you to make plans to attend. In addition we contemplate a further Executive Committee meeting to be held in the Spring. Decisions made at these meetings will be presented in general Club mailings and must be passed along to all members.

There will also be a new International Committee, with Past President Bill Smith as Chairman, entitled, “Rheumatic Fever Foundation”. By Convention action all money owed our CP Fund by the General Fund was written off, and the money still remaining in the CP Fund was transferred to the General Fun – primarily to pay off the Eugene note. This has been done. This, however, leaves our CP Fund non-existent. To offer something as a replacement, your Board of Governors felt we should learn as much as possible about the Rheumatic Fever Foundation, and the tremendous work done by 20-30 in this field. For this reason this new committee was established for the purpose of education. No active solicitation of funds will be made, this year, but since it is a major Active 20-30 project, we would be remiss if we did not find out more about it.

You see, it will be an exciting year for all of us. A year in which we expand the heritage of 36 years of service given us by outstanding men of vision into an even greater good for our communities. Let us, Area VIII of Active 20-30 International, lead the way in Enthusiasm, Goodwill and Progress. Let us bring in the most members, form the most new Clubs, perform the larger services. Let us go more than half-way toward making this merger a success. And let us get the greatest good from the services we perform.

Owen Barnes. “Renewed Incentive”. The Activian, September 1960, p3.