National Project: Back to School Shopping Spree Origins

Other 20-30 Club national projects:
Universal Fingerprinting
Safety Sallys (putting up warning signs at school’s crosswalks)

Curious to know about when clubs started shopping sprees? Or maybe just wanting to know when it became our current United States National Project?

Members from Sacramento #1 visited the re-chartered Stockton Club around 1974. That club was hosting a back to school shopping spree. They thought it a great idea and brought it back to Sacramento, where a back to school spree happened around 1980.*

More and more clubs starting holding their own shopping sprees and when a new National Project committee was formed in 1993, they ended up deciding on having this be the one that they felt clubs would get behind.

Kevin Thompson from Torrance, California “ran for National President on the campaign of a National Project. My campaign speech included … “I have a dream that on the same day, every year, thousands of Active 20-30 members together with thousands of needy children and their families will gather with the purpose of obtaining new clothes and supplies to return to school.” The vision was to create a united cause as previously Active 20-30 did not have a united National project.” He became the National President in the 1994-1995 term and got to work on making his goal a reality. He hoped to reach out to stores like Mervyn’s or Target and get a corporate deal for across the U.S.**

Back-to-School Shopping Spree

The National Project Committee met with Jan O’Laughlan, Community Projects/Public Affairs Manager, Mervyn’s, and established Saturday, August 3rd as the Active 20-30 Back-to-School Shopping Spree. This will be in concert with Mervyn’s fifth Annual ChildSpree.

With your club’s involvement and all of our clubs across the country, it is our hope to provide clothing and school supplies to over 1500 needy children on this very special day.

It has been a three year endeavor to find a project that all of our clubs could participate in no matter what size the club or how much money the club decided to spend on the project.

The National Office has a sample letter that can be used to send to your local Mervyn’s store as well as “Child Release Form” and a sample set up sheet to give you an idea on how the project should be run.

Each Mervyn’s store has available $1500 matching funds for this purpose. Mervyn’s has requested that each Active 20-30 Club contact the local store to submit a request for these matching funds. While there may be a competing non-profit agency also requesting the allocated funds, Mervyn’s is very aware of our national effort and it would therefor behoove us to submit our requests as soon as possible.

Upon receipt of the club’s request and approval of the $1500 matching funds, Mervyn’s will also provide a very detailed “How-to-Kit” to augment what you will receive from the National Office. Mervyn’s will additionally provide a 10% discount for Active 20-30 the day of the event as well as any sales or special promotions that may be going on.

It is the hope of your National Board of Directors that all of our clubs will participate in this worthwhile National project. However, we know it takes time for new projects to get incorporated into a club’s schedule. But certainly for those clubs who can’t participate this year, they will be able to join the others clubs in 1997.***

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Sept 1960, Active Club President’s Message

Renewed Incentive

By Owen Barnes
President, Active International

The last Active International Convention we will ever have is behind us. Thanks must be given to our Calgary hosts for a most memorable and fitting Convention. Thanks, too, to all of you for allowing me the privilege of serving you this coming year.

With a last nostalgic glance at the past we embark on an exciting year of progress under the Active 20-30 banner. As of August 1, 1960, we are, by unanimous action of the delegates in Calgary, a part of Active 20-30. It is my earnest belief that the delegates at Santa Cruz and those at Calgary showed considerable wisdom in deciding upon a merger. It is a logical step enabling two service-minded groups to combine their talents and enthusiasm in order to better serve their communities and their countries.

This year we must not only condition our thinking to embrace the phrase “Active 20-30 International”, but we must also continue the vigorous programs we have already undertaken to make ours the biggest and best Area of all. To do this I hope each Club will seriously attempt to win the Master Active Club Award. A careful look at the requirements for this Award will show why I feel this way. All the requirements are designed to foster a strong, healthy, well-balanced Club. This almost makes membership increase automatic, and external expansion more than probable. I have set no specific goals of membership increase or expansion because these will take place as a by-product if all Clubs set out to win the above Award. At the same time there will be more attention placed on Public Speaking (which is vital to our self-improvement), as well as all the other facets of our service life.

It must be apparent to you that I consider success or failure as a matter solely up to the local Clubs. Actually, it can’t be otherwise. For 36 years local members, local Clubs, local Club Presidents, have decided the fate of our organization. How else could it be when this is all there is? YOU are International! Your efforts will determine when your Active 20-30 will be. International officers can only inform, suggest and guide. We cannot do your work for you.

Because of the problems of merger this year we anticipate a great deal of information will be sent out to all Presidents. This information will have to be presented at regular meetings in order to keep everyone informed. For example, by the time you read this the two Executive Committees of Active and 20-30 will have met in Eugene to work out some of the necessary details of the mechanics of merger. Such proposals as need Board ratification and a delegate vote will be presented at the combined Area VIII Convention and Mid-Winter Board Meeting in January. Details of this will be presented in full in ample time for you to make plans to attend. In addition we contemplate a further Executive Committee meeting to be held in the Spring. Decisions made at these meetings will be presented in general Club mailings and must be passed along to all members.

There will also be a new International Committee, with Past President Bill Smith as Chairman, entitled, “Rheumatic Fever Foundation”. By Convention action all money owed our CP Fund by the General Fund was written off, and the money still remaining in the CP Fund was transferred to the General Fun – primarily to pay off the Eugene note. This has been done. This, however, leaves our CP Fund non-existent. To offer something as a replacement, your Board of Governors felt we should learn as much as possible about the Rheumatic Fever Foundation, and the tremendous work done by 20-30 in this field. For this reason this new committee was established for the purpose of education. No active solicitation of funds will be made, this year, but since it is a major Active 20-30 project, we would be remiss if we did not find out more about it.

You see, it will be an exciting year for all of us. A year in which we expand the heritage of 36 years of service given us by outstanding men of vision into an even greater good for our communities. Let us, Area VIII of Active 20-30 International, lead the way in Enthusiasm, Goodwill and Progress. Let us bring in the most members, form the most new Clubs, perform the larger services. Let us go more than half-way toward making this merger a success. And let us get the greatest good from the services we perform.

Owen Barnes. “Renewed Incentive”. The Activian, September 1960, p3.

August 1960, 20-30 Club President’s Message

The President’s Message

By Clint McClure

The DATE of August 1, 1960 will be remembered as the most significant in our history since the founding of 20-30, for on that day the merger of Active and 20-30 International became a reality. Both groups will retain their present administrative structures until the joint International convention in Tucson next summer, but for all other intents and purposes we are now one combine organization.

I was most fortunate in being able to attend the Active International Convention in Calgary, Alberta last month, and to see the Active delegates unanimously vote to merge with 20-30. Every International officer making a report to the convention recommended the merger, and the enthusiasm for it displayed by the delegates and members was outstanding.

Had I not seen the Active banners and badges, I would have been sure that I was attending a 20-30 convention. Their methods of operating are identical with ours, and the Active spirit is almost unbelievable. It will be a wonderful experience associating with them in Tucson and for many years thereafter.

The most impressive program Active has is that of public speaking. It has often been said that many men have excellent ideas, but they die without seeing the light of day because few men are able to express themselves. This is the core of the Active program, and through a series of contests on the local, district and International level, Activians are given a thorough schooling in this self-betterment technique.

There are many other practices and procedures in Active that will certainly benefit our combined organization. In order to realize these benefits, we must begin now to think Active 20-30, work Active 20-30, talk Active 20-30 and be Active 20-30!

Clint McClure. “The President’s Message.” The Twenty-Thirtian, August 1960, p4.

PROJECT: A Gathering of Eagles

eagles-03Pssst … Buddy, ya wanna buy an eagle? Rent one? How about a long term loan?

This is what the US Department of Interior offered the Sacramento City Zoo; a permanent loan of several pairs of Golden Eagles, provided an appropriate display area be created. And that’s when the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento go involved.

A year ago (May ’73) Bill Meeker, a Director of the city zoo, was invited to speak before the Sacramento club on “What’s New At The Zoo?” After hearing about the development of the zoo into one of the most formidable for a community the size of Sacramento, and about Meeker’s plans for future zoo development, he was invited to make a presentation before the club’s Projects and Charities Committee.

Meeker advised the P/C Committee that in order to keep pace with other similar zoos, and in order to maintain public interest and attendance, a new exhibit should be developed every one or two years. Meeker added that there were no funds available for expansion. He therefore envisioned his best source for zoo expansion would be through the Sacramento area’s service clubs. He felt that if one major club, such as Active 20-30, would provide the first new exhibit, this would be the initiative for other service clubs to build additional new exhibits.

Meeker introduced his plans to expand the zoo with a new ornithology area to include many new aviary exhibits. The first being the new eagle aerie for our national bird. He showed the P/C Committee an illustration of a new eagle display shaped like a giant canary cage and said the cost would be approximately $1,500.00 for material and construction. The committee suggested the plan ought to be revised to a larger more natural exhibit with high rock formations, trees, etc. Meeker thought this was a great idea but too expensive since it would boost the cost to around $20,000.00.

Nevertheless, the Sacramento club believed they could build such a cage, using the resources available through its own members, and voted to go ahead with the project.

eagles-01

After the zoo provided the basic design, several engineers from the club determined what the structural requirements would be and their approximate costs. They estimated if the club could obtain the majority of the materials by donations from the community, the cost could be kept within $2,000.00 … including food and beer. After this, several club members in the construction industry determined the time and manpower requirements. They estimated ten to fifteen members working on the project for five or six weekends would complete the entire job.

An “Eagle Cage Committee” was formed with two co-chairmen: Steve Whichard, who is a partner in Whichard Construction, to provide the expertise and round up materials; and Ned Strong, from the mortgage business, to provide manpower.

The exhibit was planned to include a 25-foot high heavy-gauge screened area which could best be framed with telephone poles. The then-president of the Sacramento club (ahem) just happened to be employed by Pacific Telephone and was able to obtain enough poles for the exhibit, which the telephone company also placed. Through members in the construction industry, cement for the foundation, lumber, nails, metal eagles-02doors for the building, and many other materials were provided. Another major construction item was the framing and gunnite material to create the rock-mountain structure. Steve Whichard was able to have all of the material, as well as its construction, donated by the Northern California Lethe and Plaster Contractors Association. This, obviously saved the club several thousand dollars. All other labor, in addition to tools such as forklifts, power equipment, hammers and pliers, was provided by club members.

The cage took seven working weekends to complete, starting last October and ending in April. Dedication will be May 23, 1974.

Sacramento City Zoo now has a new eagle aerie at no cost to the city, valued at $20,000.00, because of the initiative, imagination and effective use of resources of the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento.

Hefflefinger, Dean. “A Gathering of Eagles.” Active 20-30. April/May 1974: 12-13. Print.

eagles