Women in Active 20-30

In an effort to bring our association into conformity with the public accommodation laws of the State of California and other states, and in light of last summer’s Supreme Court decision mandating the admission of women in Rotary Clubs and subsequent decisions by other mainstream service clubs, such as Lions, Kiwanis, and Jaycees, to allow women as members, your elected National Board has prepared a proposed change in our constitution and bylaws allowing for qualified women to apply for membership in Active 20-30. Our National Association is incorporated, along with Active 20-30 International, in the State of California. While our constitution is technically in violation of these public accommodation laws and subject to scrutiny by the Franchise Tax Board of California, we have not yet been challenged by this taxing authority, also, to date, our constitutional provisions for membership as expressly male-only, has not been challenged by court action or lawsuit, which could definitively determine whether Active 20-30, is in fact, more private and social than public and whether finite and strict membership guidelines are universally and uniformly applied, to protect our male-only status and U.S. constitutional rights. It’s been argued that perhaps, if challenged in court, we could delay a decision for a few years through the legal and appeals process. However, this action would exact a cost, in potential legal fees, and resultant reduction or loss of membership services, the potential loss of our tax status, unfavorable press, and create a divisive issue for our clubs with the possible loss of some dedicated members or clubs.

What effect will this proposed amendment to our constitution have on our association’s membership in Active 20-30/International and in WOCO? The officers of Active 20-30/International are cognizant of our situation and are confident that we will act in a manner which is responsible and prudent in the face of federal and state law regarding this issue.

Active 20-30/International is also incorporated under the laws of the State of California. Also, it is inherent in our international bylaws, that a National association not operate in the direct or indirect conflict with the “laws of the land”. Inquiry on the impact of women in our association in relation to our membership in WOCO was requested. The response was that the WOCO Board and/or a WOCO AGM would not act until needing to do so. We will draft appropriate bylaws amendments for WOCO and International to explicitly provide for the admission of women into an association where its been determined to be the correct action with regards to this sort of legislation or binding rulings by the courts. At this point, we presume that the ratification of this amendment at our next annual general meeting (AGM), during the convention in Phoenix, will not jeopardize our status in WOCO or International.

How will this change affect our clubs and auxiliaries? First, it should be noted that the amendment does not require all of our member clubs to begin admitting women. It provides for women to apply for membership, and be granted membership if qualified, in those states with equal accommodation statutes, such as California, your club will want to check with your state’s agency or authority to verify the existence of these types of laws. (Headquarters staff is presently researching this as well.) We also recommend that your club re-examine your specific membership guidelines to ensure the uniform application of these criteria for prospective members. This action could help prevent local potential legal entanglements with regards to new member applications by women, as well as men. In the states where these laws currently don’t exist, clubs are not mandated to accept applications from women or to grant membership to them. It is the local clubs choice in this case. However, it is incumbent upon the local club officers to be aware of specific local legislation or ruling before acting.

Women’s auxiliary clubs can continue to function as they have previously. No amendments have been proposed, to date, to alter their status. However, these clubs may make formal application for an Active 20-30 club charter. As with all charter applications, the chartering process and procedures must be met prior to approval by the National Board and of course, assuming this amendment is passed by our AGM.

The National President and officers urge you to consider and discuss this issue in your own club and to temper your discourse and judgement in light of the realities we face. Ample opportunity to further discuss this amendment at the upcoming Regional and National meetings will be available, prior to the formal vote, in Phoenix. This vote will cast the immediate and long term future of Active 20-30. The National Board recommends that your club votes in favor of the amendment in its current form, as the best solution to this issue.

“Women in Active 20-30”. The Active Twenty-Thirtian, May 1988, p3.

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History of Active 20-30 International (part 2)

The History of Active 20-30 International

(quick recap of how two clubs merged into one)

Active 20-30 International had its actual beginnings in 1922 when young men in two widely separated communities of the United States saw the need for a service club for young men. They found that established service clubs were dominated by older men, run by older men and whose officers were invariably much older men.

This realization led those groups of ambitious young men to stray away from existing groups and organize a club of their own, a club wherein young men would have a chance to engage actively in service to their communities; a club where young ideas, backed by enthusiasm and the energy of youth, could share in civic responsibilities on an equal basis with clubs composed of older men.

These pioneers of young men’s service clubs were located in Aberdeen, Washington where Active International was formed and in Sacramento, California, where 20-30 International had its beginnings.

Both 20-30 International and Active International where chartered members of the World Council of Young Men’s Service Clubs. John Armenia, Joe Crowe and Arnie Scheldt of Active and Dr. James Vernetti, Henry Heyl and Ray Fletcher of 20-30 were among those who fostered the World Council movement up to its formal beginning in 1945.

In 1959 President Norm Morrison of 20-30 and President Ken Helling of Active exchanged a letter and renewed the long standing proposal that these two almost identical young men’s service clubs should merge.

Throughout 1959 and 1960 meetings were held between the two groups, culminating in the proposed Constitution, and resolution to be presented to the 1960 conventions of each organization.

At the 20-30 International Convention held in Santa Cruz, CA in 1960, the delegates unanimously adopted the merger proposal and the Constitution. One month later, the delegates at the Active international Convention in Calgary, Alberta, also unanimously adopted the propositions.

Therefore, on August 1, 1960, Active and 20-30 became Active 20- 30 International.

During the year of the merger, Active 20-30 had 7,500 members from 365 clubs in Canada, USA, Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador and Cuba.

The first convention of Active 20-30 International was held in Tucson, AZ, July 10-14, 1961, where the Constitution and By-Laws were officially adopted.

Jack Kummert was elected President; Federico G. Lugo as First Vice-President; James Robertson as Second Vice-President. Clint McClure and Owen Barnes, the last presidents of 20-30 and Active respectively, stayed as members of the International Directors Council as Immediate Past Presidents.

Other members of the First Council of Directors of Active 20-30 International were: Ray Manges, Area 1; Norm Jensen, Area 2; Skeet Glidewell, Area 3; Forrest K. Stewart, Area 4; Roy Stype, Area 5; Emilio Pérez-Banuet, Area 6; Joaquin Bours, Associate Director of Area 6; Angel Moreno, Area 7 and Bob Baumgartner, Area 8.

History of Active 20-30 International (part 1)

Active 20-30 International is the result of the fusion of two Clubs, Active International and 20-30 International, whose story is told below.

733938_498805500176554_1550661425_nHistory of Active International

Active International was founded in Aberdeen, Washington February, 10, 1922. A group of young men including Ernest Axland, Paul Arthand, Carl Morck, Carl Springer, Carl Teman, Edgar Jones and Pat McNamara were eager to give the young men a more active part in the affairs of the community. Thus, they formed together to establish a young men’s club which they named “Active”. They elected Ernest Axland as president.

The emblem selected for Active was the buzz saw. The buzz saw is just about the most active object you can find anywhere. Even when motionless, as it is on the emblem, it has the appearance of intense activity. Since Aberdeen was a lumber center and sawmills with humming saw blades were in evidence everywhere, it was only logical that the founders of Active chose the buzz saw for their emblem. The buzz saw represents the usefulness of intense activity and the abundant energy of responsible youth, means power, strength, and progress.

Active was incorporated under the laws of the State of Washington on August 20, 1924. Before long, Active Clubs were formed in Elma, Hoquiam, Montesano and Olympia.

In 1925 the first convention was held in Montesano, Washington with Carl Morck of Aberdeen being elected as president. In the same year, the name of the organization was officially changed from Active Club to Active Club International.

In June of 1929, the organization became international in fact, as well as in name, with the chartering of the Vancouver International Club in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Active clubs soon spread through Washington, Oregon, California and Montana in the United States and the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta in Canada. Clubs were also located in Idaho, Hawaii and Washington D.C.

The motto selected for this growing organization was: “Enthusiasm – Goodwill – Progress”.

  • Enthusiasm: “Get in” with all your heart, with spirit, interest and energy in all the activities of the Club.
  • Goodwill: Be more than fair in relations with our fellow men, bring more harmony, mutual appreciation and tolerance; be friendly, show greater concern for the welfare of others; justice and fairness in business, cooperation for mutual progress.
  • Progress: Improve health; better education and recreation, improving conditions for development and welfare of society.

The slogan used as a guide for all Active projects was “A man never stands so tall as when he kneels to help a child”.

The National Offices of Active International have been located in Aberdeen, Tacoma, Raymond and Spokane, Washington; Portland, Oregon; and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

336708_218824074841366_328015875_oHistory of 20-30 International

 20-30 International was founded in Sacramento, CA in the fall of 1922. Paul W. Claiborne was just twenty years of age when he conceived the idea of forming a service club whose members would consist of young men.

Together with Earl B. Casey, Alfred B. Franke, Charles G. McBride and Marshall A. Page, he went with his idea to Mitch Nathan, the president of the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

Nathan approved of his plan and appointed a committee to foster the formation of a club whose activities would aid the growth and advancement of young men. This committee consisted of F.A.S. “Sandy” Foale, Chairman; Charles Hansen, Clinton Harbor, Joseph Quire and Mrs. Alva Archer.

A meeting was held in the Chamber of Commerce building on Tuesday, December 12, 1922, with Judge Peter J. Shields as the speaker. It was decided to proceed with the organization work immediately. Upon the suggestion of Sandy Foale, the name 20-30 was adopted.

An organizational meeting was held on December 19, 1922, and Paul Claiborne was unanimously elected as the first president. Sandy Foale was named chairman of the advisory board. After the Sacramento club had established itself, 20-30 began to expand to new areas.

On March 10, 1924, the Stockton club was chartered with the assistance of the Rotary Club in Stockton.  G. Lewis Fox was elected president, and Dr. Hall was named Chairman of the Advisory Board.

A meeting between Sacramento and Stockton was held on March 5, 1925, and they created the 20-30 Club Executive Council to help with expansion to other cities.

On August of 1925, the third Club, San Bernardino, California becomes affiliated with the organization.

During 1926, 20-30 Clubs were formed in San Francisco, Hayward, Tracy and Oakland.

Delegates from the seven clubs met in San Francisco on August 21, 1926. This was the first convention of 20-30. A Constitution was adopted and the following officers were elected: Sumner Mering, President; Tom Louttit, Vice President; Ivan Shoemaker, Secretary/Treasurer.

From 20-30’s inception in 1922 until December 1941, charters were granted to 260 clubs and a total membership of 4,675 was attained. During the war years, approximately 65 percent of the membership served in the armed forces. This compelled 68 clubs to disband and decreased the number of active clubs to 122 with active membership at 1,800. In many cases the clubs were kept on active status by one or two members who maintained the charter.

Beginning with the chartering of the Juarez Club on February 16, 1944, these started the movement of 20-30 in Mexico and Latin America. It was a result of these charters that the name of the association was changed to 20-30 International at the 1946 Victory Convention.

In the years to follow, the organization continued to expand through the Mid West to Ohio and south of the border to Mexico, and afterwards to El Salvador, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador, Cuba and Colombia.

The emblem of 20-30 International was an hourglass, symbolizing the passage of time and the need of young man to take advantage of his time and energy for useful activities.  Around this hourglass, there were four “S”.

The four “S” have a double significance since these were the initials of the first four 20-30 Clubs (Sacramento, Stockton, San Bernardino and San Francisco) and they also conform the initials of the slogan “Sincerity in Service, our Slogan for Success”.

The motto of 20-30 International was, “Youth, to be Served, Must Serve”. Both were authored by Sandy Foale.

Meet Past Actives: Milciades Perez & Elias Brache

Two founding members, Milciades Perez and Elias Brache, recently came and shared their stories with the current members of Active 20-30 Club of Santo Domingo.

It was interesting for me to learn that before 1962, the Dominican Republic was under a dictatorship. No public meetings or groups were able to form. After he was assassinated, this opened the country to growth.

Under the leadership of Rene Fernandez (San Salvador #442) members of Active 20-30 reached out to the young men in April 1962. They started holding meetings in May. And by August, the Active 20-30 Club of Santo Domingo, was the first club chartered in the Dominican Republic.

Mr. Perez and Mr. Brache formed the 40+ club and the Active 20-30 Foundation in 1982. The foundation helped build a hospital that continues to see more than 40 patients per year in 15 specialties.

It was also shared that Mr. Perez was the author of the Dominican Republic flag salutation (similar to our Pledge of Allegiance here in the United States)

 

 

Just like the “legacy stories” I share regarding 2nd, 3rd, and 4th generational Active members, this is a series on the Past Actives and their stories. Please contact me (I would love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

Meet Past Active: Jim Vogt

Past President of Healdsburg #205, California

In 2011, Dan Chapin, who was the current president of Healdsburg #205 shared about sitting down with gentleman turning 100. They had something in common to talk about – Active 20-30.

Dan told us, “I had a once in a lifetime opportunity to sit down with him for an interview that the local online news folks organized. It was one of the most amazing life experiences and for a guy who re-chartered an old club I never imagined this kind of thing would happen.”

Among the stories Jim Vogt passed along, he also gave Dan his 1947 Past Active card.
You can read the published article from The Healdsburg Patch and watch a few videos of Dan and Jim’s day together, their common interests and how the club has changed with time.

Sadly, Jim passed away the following year on May 4, 2012. (see obituary)

I invite you all to connect with past actives – both recent and not-so-recent times. Share with us stories you’ve heard and mementos you’ve seen that help us understand our history together.

Just like the “legacy stories” I share regarding 2nd, 3rd, and 4th generational Active members, I would like to start a series on the Past Actives and their stories. Please contact me (I would love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

3rd Generation Member in Sacramento #1

(REPOST from 2013)

Active Member:
David Brandenburger, 3rd generation

Any offices you held/hold in 20-30? President, Fall 2012

Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in? Did they hold any offices in 20-30? His Grandfather, Sheldon, was a member in the mid 1930’s. And his father, Steve, was a member and on the Board of Directors in the late 1960’s.

If you are a generational member or know of someone who is, please contact me (I’d love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

  • From [insert club]
  • Active member [insert name] is [#] generation. Any offices you held/hold in 20-30?
  • Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
  • Did they hold any offices in 20-30?
  • Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects? Fun tidbits?
  • Can I get a photo of active member to use and, if possible, the other family members?

You can be as brief or as descriptive as you would like. Either way, I am looking forward to hearing from all the generational members out there.

National Project: Back to School Shopping Spree Origins

Other 20-30 Club national projects:
Universal Fingerprinting
Safety Sallys (putting up warning signs at school’s crosswalks)

Curious to know about when clubs started shopping sprees? Or maybe just wanting to know when it became our current United States National Project?

Members from Sacramento #1 visited the re-chartered Stockton Club around 1974. That club was hosting a back to school shopping spree. They thought it a great idea and brought it back to Sacramento, where a back to school spree happened around 1980.*

More and more clubs starting holding their own shopping sprees and when a new National Project committee was formed in 1993, they ended up deciding on having this be the one that they felt clubs would get behind.

Kevin Thompson from Torrance, California “ran for National President on the campaign of a National Project. My campaign speech included … “I have a dream that on the same day, every year, thousands of Active 20-30 members together with thousands of needy children and their families will gather with the purpose of obtaining new clothes and supplies to return to school.” The vision was to create a united cause as previously Active 20-30 did not have a united National project.” He became the National President in the 1994-1995 term and got to work on making his goal a reality. He hoped to reach out to stores like Mervyn’s or Target and get a corporate deal for across the U.S.**

Back-to-School Shopping Spree

The National Project Committee met with Jan O’Laughlan, Community Projects/Public Affairs Manager, Mervyn’s, and established Saturday, August 3rd as the Active 20-30 Back-to-School Shopping Spree. This will be in concert with Mervyn’s fifth Annual ChildSpree.

With your club’s involvement and all of our clubs across the country, it is our hope to provide clothing and school supplies to over 1500 needy children on this very special day.

It has been a three year endeavor to find a project that all of our clubs could participate in no matter what size the club or how much money the club decided to spend on the project.

The National Office has a sample letter that can be used to send to your local Mervyn’s store as well as “Child Release Form” and a sample set up sheet to give you an idea on how the project should be run.

Each Mervyn’s store has available $1500 matching funds for this purpose. Mervyn’s has requested that each Active 20-30 Club contact the local store to submit a request for these matching funds. While there may be a competing non-profit agency also requesting the allocated funds, Mervyn’s is very aware of our national effort and it would therefor behoove us to submit our requests as soon as possible.

Upon receipt of the club’s request and approval of the $1500 matching funds, Mervyn’s will also provide a very detailed “How-to-Kit” to augment what you will receive from the National Office. Mervyn’s will additionally provide a 10% discount for Active 20-30 the day of the event as well as any sales or special promotions that may be going on.

It is the hope of your National Board of Directors that all of our clubs will participate in this worthwhile National project. However, we know it takes time for new projects to get incorporated into a club’s schedule. But certainly for those clubs who can’t participate this year, they will be able to join the others clubs in 1997.***