2nd Generation Member in Redwood Empire #1029

Thank you for sharing your history, Christy.

Active member:
Christy Calverley, 2nd generation

Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
Her mother, Jeannie Calverley, was a member of Redwood Empire #1029. The club chartered 23 years ago and has it’s first second generation member. [How neat is that?!]
Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects? Fun tidbits?
Christy experienced her first International Convention with her mother when they went to the one in Colombia in 2011.

If you are a generational member or know of someone who is, please contact me (I’d love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

From [insert club]
Active member [insert name] is [#] generation. Any offices you held/hold in 20-30?
Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
Did they hold any offices in 20-30?
Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects? Fun tidbits?
Can I get a photo of active member to use and, if possible, the other family members?
You can be as brief or as descriptive as you would like. Either way, I am looking forward to hearing from all the generational members out there.

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3rd Generation Member in Auburn #19

Danny Miller, 3rd generation

He may be a 3rd generation member, but he is also 1 of 8 family members to be part of Active 20-30.  Here are his answers to my questions.

Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
I am one of eight family members to be part of Auburn 20-30 that include my Grandfather Chuck Tutt PAL, my Grandmother Laura Tutt PAL, my Fatter Tony Miller PAL 19 year member, my Mother Charla Miller (Auburn 20-30ettes), Uncle Steve Tutt PAL 20 year member, Aunt Debbie Tutt (Auburn 20-30ettes), and my cousin Kathryn Tutt (current active member).

Did they hold any offices in 20-30?
To the best of my knowledge everyone but Kathryn has held the office of president.

Any other noteworthy accomplishments? 
I have held an office in Auburn #19 of some sort for 17 of my 20 years including a multi-year term as treasurer, 5 terms as president and Region 4 director 2009-2010.  I have chaired many (to many to mention) projects and events.

Big projects?
My biggest project so far has been the Auburn Brewfest, I chaired this the first 4 years.

(left to right in the photo:  Danny Miller, Tony Miller, Charla Miller, Steve Tutt, Debie Tutt, and Kathryn Tutt)

If you are a Generational member or know of someone who is, please contact me (I’d love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

  • From [insert club]
  • Active member [insert name] is [#] generation.  Any offices you held/hold in 20-30?
  • Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
  • Did they hold any offices in 20-30?
  • Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects?  Fun tidbits?
  • Can I get a photo of active member to use and, if possible, the other family members?

4th Generation Member in Santa Rosa #50

In January 2013, I had attended Active 20-30 Club of Santa Rosa #50’s installation of officers. I learned that the member being installed as the new president for the term was a 4th generation member.

Being a historian and a multi-generational member myself, I was excited to discover this. One of my goals is to find and recognize active members that come from families with past Active 20-30 members.

2013 Santa RosaLeft to right on the photo:
Brad Demeo – a past member and god-father to Dusty
Dustin Destruel – Spring 2013 President
Michele Spilman (myself)
Jean (Dusty) Destruel – Fall 1951 President and Dusty’s grandfather
M. Kevin Destruel – a past member and Dusty’s father
Elie Destruel (other family member connection worth noting) – Fall 1934 President and Dusty’s great-grandfather

Fun fact is that all generations are/were members of Santa Rosa #50.

If you are a generational member or know of someone who is, please contact me (I’d love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

  • From [insert club]
  • Active member [insert name] is [#] generation. Any offices you held/hold in 20-30?
  • Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
  • Did they hold any offices in 20-30?
  • Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects? Fun tidbits?
  • Can I get a photo of active member to use and, if possible, the other family members?

You can be as brief or as descriptive as you would like. Either way, I am looking forward to hearing from all the generational members out there.

Active 20-30 Wardrobe Collection

Active 20-30 Dominican Republic wardrobe from the 1960’s displayed during their 2015 National Convention.10653838_10152927107196814_7159475398280007963_n (thanks Geoffrey Cheung for sharing this photo)

I would love to start a collection of photos of Active 20-30 wardrobe. Please post here or send to my email: mchlspil@gmail.com

 

Searching for Active 20-30 History

The easiest way to search for history on Active 20-30 is to go through your club records.  At least, I hope there are records being kept with your club reports.  In my club, the club historian’s duty is to photograph members at different events and capture memorable moments at meetings.  She collects all the fliers and newsletters and bind them all together into a scrapbook at the end of the term.  This is a great way to keep a record of club’s doings each year.  By doing this she continues to add to the history of the club.  But what if you don’t have much in your club’s files and scrapbooks?  What if you are a new club or re-chartering?

Hopefully you would like to find out about your club’s accomplishments in their service to their communities.  The way I’ve been researching started with my club’s archives and sending out requests to past presidents for their scrapbooks.  Slowly getting those scanned and digitized to be able to share with everyone.

The second step was to go to the library and start looking into newspapers.  The key phrases I’ve been using so far:

  • 20-30 Club
  • Twenty Thirty Club
  • Association of 20-30 Clubs
  • 20-30 International
  • (for those clubs that are in Oregon & Washington, try Active Club)
  • Active 20-30
  • (the name of your club)
  • (the name of your club) plus –ettes at the end. These would be club auxiliaries (these were the married wives of members forming their own service group in connection to the husbands clubs)
  • Then find names of your past presidents and start searching them
  • Other notable members in your club
  • (don’t forget lots of times they wrote 20/30 instead of 20-30)
  • Specific events your club might have done through the years
  • Dates you know events happened that they might have covered (example: Conventions)

You can also do this on the internet, but I mostly find information listed on our club websites.  I am slowly finding other historical information though.   Newspapers are adding their archives on the internet, sometimes you have to pay to search and print articles.

The third step is when you have specific information you can go back to your past actives and ask questions that might help trigger better memories of events.  Example, asking a person what they can remember doing during their years in the club would probably result in them saying, “I can’t recall, lots of things”.  But if you have a specific question, “Do you recall how Shopping Spree started?” you might get more information or at least more hints to narrow down when it started or who would be a better person to ask.

A fourth option for records is to go to your cities archives.  Here in Sacramento there are a few places to try to find information.

The State Archives (mostly related to government type stuff like articles of incorporation)

Center for Sacramento History (collections of newspaper articles, original photos might by found, other documents related to the city only)

and the State Library (as well as the city library, which I touched on earlier)

Any more information on ways to research our organization’s history I would love to hear about.

If you find anything, please share it either by writing to me at mchlspil@gmail.com or posting on our Facebook page:  Active 20-30 Club Historical Findings

 

PROJECT: A Gathering of Eagles

eagles-03Pssst … Buddy, ya wanna buy an eagle? Rent one? How about a long term loan?

This is what the US Department of Interior offered the Sacramento City Zoo; a permanent loan of several pairs of Golden Eagles, provided an appropriate display area be created. And that’s when the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento go involved.

A year ago (May ’73) Bill Meeker, a Director of the city zoo, was invited to speak before the Sacramento club on “What’s New At The Zoo?” After hearing about the development of the zoo into one of the most formidable for a community the size of Sacramento, and about Meeker’s plans for future zoo development, he was invited to make a presentation before the club’s Projects and Charities Committee.

Meeker advised the P/C Committee that in order to keep pace with other similar zoos, and in order to maintain public interest and attendance, a new exhibit should be developed every one or two years. Meeker added that there were no funds available for expansion. He therefore envisioned his best source for zoo expansion would be through the Sacramento area’s service clubs. He felt that if one major club, such as Active 20-30, would provide the first new exhibit, this would be the initiative for other service clubs to build additional new exhibits.

Meeker introduced his plans to expand the zoo with a new ornithology area to include many new aviary exhibits. The first being the new eagle aerie for our national bird. He showed the P/C Committee an illustration of a new eagle display shaped like a giant canary cage and said the cost would be approximately $1,500.00 for material and construction. The committee suggested the plan ought to be revised to a larger more natural exhibit with high rock formations, trees, etc. Meeker thought this was a great idea but too expensive since it would boost the cost to around $20,000.00.

Nevertheless, the Sacramento club believed they could build such a cage, using the resources available through its own members, and voted to go ahead with the project.

eagles-01

After the zoo provided the basic design, several engineers from the club determined what the structural requirements would be and their approximate costs. They estimated if the club could obtain the majority of the materials by donations from the community, the cost could be kept within $2,000.00 … including food and beer. After this, several club members in the construction industry determined the time and manpower requirements. They estimated ten to fifteen members working on the project for five or six weekends would complete the entire job.

An “Eagle Cage Committee” was formed with two co-chairmen: Steve Whichard, who is a partner in Whichard Construction, to provide the expertise and round up materials; and Ned Strong, from the mortgage business, to provide manpower.

The exhibit was planned to include a 25-foot high heavy-gauge screened area which could best be framed with telephone poles. The then-president of the Sacramento club (ahem) just happened to be employed by Pacific Telephone and was able to obtain enough poles for the exhibit, which the telephone company also placed. Through members in the construction industry, cement for the foundation, lumber, nails, metal eagles-02doors for the building, and many other materials were provided. Another major construction item was the framing and gunnite material to create the rock-mountain structure. Steve Whichard was able to have all of the material, as well as its construction, donated by the Northern California Lethe and Plaster Contractors Association. This, obviously saved the club several thousand dollars. All other labor, in addition to tools such as forklifts, power equipment, hammers and pliers, was provided by club members.

The cage took seven working weekends to complete, starting last October and ending in April. Dedication will be May 23, 1974.

Sacramento City Zoo now has a new eagle aerie at no cost to the city, valued at $20,000.00, because of the initiative, imagination and effective use of resources of the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento.

Hefflefinger, Dean. “A Gathering of Eagles.” Active 20-30. April/May 1974: 12-13. Print.

eagles

I’ll have 3 tacos, a water, and here’s a 20-30 Bell

I loved hearing this story and sharing it with others. It takes place in June 2013, where a nice young lady came up to a taco stand at the El Dorado County Fair (California). The stand is always manned by Active 20-30 Cub of Hangtown #43. She said “I’ll have 3 tacos, a water, and here I want your club to have this.”

10593_10201405017554285_89948199_n

Ryan West (Past President of Hangtown #43) expanded on the story; “The girl who gave it to me said it had been in her grandfather’s possession for several years (decades probably). He passed away around 10 years ago and it has just been with her grandma since and they wanted to try to get it back to where it belongs or a good home.”

I have done some Google research on the names etched on the bell and it is looking like it might have belonged to Palo Alto #25.

Here are the names of the “Presidents” on the bell:wp_20130807_001
(in no particular order)
• Jack Hansen
• Bill Johnson
• Warner Morgan
• Bob Hollandsworth
• Ben Gibson
• Hank Nordberg
• Chris Bernard
• Frank Pfyl
• Jack Merrill
• Jack J. Janssen
• Bill “snuffy” smith
• Claude anderson
• John santana
• Don ayers
• “R.Bill” Hardin
• Bruce Brown