Portland Makes Frank Sinatra Honorary Member

Climax to all membership drive efforts in 1947 for the Portland, Oregon 20-30 Club was the pinning of a 20-30 button on singer Frank Sinatra.  President Bill Thelin made the presentation to the popular radio and screen star at the huge PAL benefit show, stage at Portland’s International Exposition building.

Appearing in Portland for the first time, Sinatra headlined a large group of Hollywood stars that included Edward Arnold, Jack Paar, Eddy Peabody and singer Nora Martin.  In close cooperation with other civic groups, Portland Twenty-Thirtians helped to sponsor the first PAL charity performance, designed to raise funds for PAL, Inc. a public youth building program set up to fight juvenile delinquency.

When appeals for public help failed, Twenty-Thirtians pounded pavement distributing posters; handled the multitude of details necessary to publish a printed program from advertising sales to the vending.  A speaker’s bureau was set up from which fast-on-their-feet speakers carried the story of PAL and publicized its purposes to countless community groups.

by Dick Johnson

The Twenty-Thirtian. February 1948. Volume XXII, Number V.

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History of Active 20-30 International (part 1)

Active 20-30 International is the result of the fusion of two Clubs, Active International and 20-30 International, whose story is told below.

733938_498805500176554_1550661425_nHistory of Active International

Active International was founded in Aberdeen, Washington February, 10, 1922. A group of young men including Ernest Axland, Paul Arthand, Carl Morck, Carl Springer, Carl Teman, Edgar Jones and Pat McNamara were eager to give the young men a more active part in the affairs of the community. Thus, they formed together to establish a young men’s club which they named “Active”. They elected Ernest Axland as president.

The emblem selected for Active was the buzz saw. The buzz saw is just about the most active object you can find anywhere. Even when motionless, as it is on the emblem, it has the appearance of intense activity. Since Aberdeen was a lumber center and sawmills with humming saw blades were in evidence everywhere, it was only logical that the founders of Active chose the buzz saw for their emblem. The buzz saw represents the usefulness of intense activity and the abundant energy of responsible youth, means power, strength, and progress.

Active was incorporated under the laws of the State of Washington on August 20, 1924. Before long, Active Clubs were formed in Elma, Hoquiam, Montesano and Olympia.

In 1925 the first convention was held in Montesano, Washington with Carl Morck of Aberdeen being elected as president. In the same year, the name of the organization was officially changed from Active Club to Active Club International.

In June of 1929, the organization became international in fact, as well as in name, with the chartering of the Vancouver International Club in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Active clubs soon spread through Washington, Oregon, California and Montana in the United States and the provinces of British Columbia and Alberta in Canada. Clubs were also located in Idaho, Hawaii and Washington D.C.

The motto selected for this growing organization was: “Enthusiasm – Goodwill – Progress”.

  • Enthusiasm: “Get in” with all your heart, with spirit, interest and energy in all the activities of the Club.
  • Goodwill: Be more than fair in relations with our fellow men, bring more harmony, mutual appreciation and tolerance; be friendly, show greater concern for the welfare of others; justice and fairness in business, cooperation for mutual progress.
  • Progress: Improve health; better education and recreation, improving conditions for development and welfare of society.

The slogan used as a guide for all Active projects was “A man never stands so tall as when he kneels to help a child”.

The National Offices of Active International have been located in Aberdeen, Tacoma, Raymond and Spokane, Washington; Portland, Oregon; and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

336708_218824074841366_328015875_oHistory of 20-30 International

 20-30 International was founded in Sacramento, CA in the fall of 1922. Paul W. Claiborne was just twenty years of age when he conceived the idea of forming a service club whose members would consist of young men.

Together with Earl B. Casey, Alfred B. Franke, Charles G. McBride and Marshall A. Page, he went with his idea to Mitch Nathan, the president of the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

Nathan approved of his plan and appointed a committee to foster the formation of a club whose activities would aid the growth and advancement of young men. This committee consisted of F.A.S. “Sandy” Foale, Chairman; Charles Hansen, Clinton Harbor, Joseph Quire and Mrs. Alva Archer.

A meeting was held in the Chamber of Commerce building on Tuesday, December 12, 1922, with Judge Peter J. Shields as the speaker. It was decided to proceed with the organization work immediately. Upon the suggestion of Sandy Foale, the name 20-30 was adopted.

An organizational meeting was held on December 19, 1922, and Paul Claiborne was unanimously elected as the first president. Sandy Foale was named chairman of the advisory board. After the Sacramento club had established itself, 20-30 began to expand to new areas.

On March 10, 1924, the Stockton club was chartered with the assistance of the Rotary Club in Stockton.  G. Lewis Fox was elected president, and Dr. Hall was named Chairman of the Advisory Board.

A meeting between Sacramento and Stockton was held on March 5, 1925, and they created the 20-30 Club Executive Council to help with expansion to other cities.

On August of 1925, the third Club, San Bernardino, California becomes affiliated with the organization.

During 1926, 20-30 Clubs were formed in San Francisco, Hayward, Tracy and Oakland.

Delegates from the seven clubs met in San Francisco on August 21, 1926. This was the first convention of 20-30. A Constitution was adopted and the following officers were elected: Sumner Mering, President; Tom Louttit, Vice President; Ivan Shoemaker, Secretary/Treasurer.

From 20-30’s inception in 1922 until December 1941, charters were granted to 260 clubs and a total membership of 4,675 was attained. During the war years, approximately 65 percent of the membership served in the armed forces. This compelled 68 clubs to disband and decreased the number of active clubs to 122 with active membership at 1,800. In many cases the clubs were kept on active status by one or two members who maintained the charter.

Beginning with the chartering of the Juarez Club on February 16, 1944, these started the movement of 20-30 in Mexico and Latin America. It was a result of these charters that the name of the association was changed to 20-30 International at the 1946 Victory Convention.

In the years to follow, the organization continued to expand through the Mid West to Ohio and south of the border to Mexico, and afterwards to El Salvador, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador, Cuba and Colombia.

The emblem of 20-30 International was an hourglass, symbolizing the passage of time and the need of young man to take advantage of his time and energy for useful activities.  Around this hourglass, there were four “S”.

The four “S” have a double significance since these were the initials of the first four 20-30 Clubs (Sacramento, Stockton, San Bernardino and San Francisco) and they also conform the initials of the slogan “Sincerity in Service, our Slogan for Success”.

The motto of 20-30 International was, “Youth, to be Served, Must Serve”. Both were authored by Sandy Foale.

Meet Past Active: Jim Vogt

Past President of Healdsburg #205, California

In 2011, Dan Chapin, who was the current president of Healdsburg #205 shared about sitting down with gentleman turning 100. They had something in common to talk about – Active 20-30.

Dan told us, “I had a once in a lifetime opportunity to sit down with him for an interview that the local online news folks organized. It was one of the most amazing life experiences and for a guy who re-chartered an old club I never imagined this kind of thing would happen.”

Among the stories Jim Vogt passed along, he also gave Dan his 1947 Past Active card.
You can read the published article from The Healdsburg Patch and watch a few videos of Dan and Jim’s day together, their common interests and how the club has changed with time.

Sadly, Jim passed away the following year on May 4, 2012. (see obituary)

I invite you all to connect with past actives – both recent and not-so-recent times. Share with us stories you’ve heard and mementos you’ve seen that help us understand our history together.

Just like the “legacy stories” I share regarding 2nd, 3rd, and 4th generational Active members, I would like to start a series on the Past Actives and their stories. Please contact me (I would love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

August 1960, 20-30 Club President’s Message

The President’s Message

By Clint McClure

The DATE of August 1, 1960 will be remembered as the most significant in our history since the founding of 20-30, for on that day the merger of Active and 20-30 International became a reality. Both groups will retain their present administrative structures until the joint International convention in Tucson next summer, but for all other intents and purposes we are now one combine organization.

I was most fortunate in being able to attend the Active International Convention in Calgary, Alberta last month, and to see the Active delegates unanimously vote to merge with 20-30. Every International officer making a report to the convention recommended the merger, and the enthusiasm for it displayed by the delegates and members was outstanding.

Had I not seen the Active banners and badges, I would have been sure that I was attending a 20-30 convention. Their methods of operating are identical with ours, and the Active spirit is almost unbelievable. It will be a wonderful experience associating with them in Tucson and for many years thereafter.

The most impressive program Active has is that of public speaking. It has often been said that many men have excellent ideas, but they die without seeing the light of day because few men are able to express themselves. This is the core of the Active program, and through a series of contests on the local, district and International level, Activians are given a thorough schooling in this self-betterment technique.

There are many other practices and procedures in Active that will certainly benefit our combined organization. In order to realize these benefits, we must begin now to think Active 20-30, work Active 20-30, talk Active 20-30 and be Active 20-30!

Clint McClure. “The President’s Message.” The Twenty-Thirtian, August 1960, p4.

I’ll have 3 tacos, a water, and here’s a 20-30 Bell

I loved hearing this story and sharing it with others. It takes place in June 2013, where a nice young lady came up to a taco stand at the El Dorado County Fair (California). The stand is always manned by Active 20-30 Cub of Hangtown #43. She said “I’ll have 3 tacos, a water, and here I want your club to have this.”

10593_10201405017554285_89948199_n

Ryan West (Past President of Hangtown #43) expanded on the story; “The girl who gave it to me said it had been in her grandfather’s possession for several years (decades probably). He passed away around 10 years ago and it has just been with her grandma since and they wanted to try to get it back to where it belongs or a good home.”

I have done some Google research on the names etched on the bell and it is looking like it might have belonged to Palo Alto #25.

Here are the names of the “Presidents” on the bell:wp_20130807_001
(in no particular order)
• Jack Hansen
• Bill Johnson
• Warner Morgan
• Bob Hollandsworth
• Ben Gibson
• Hank Nordberg
• Chris Bernard
• Frank Pfyl
• Jack Merrill
• Jack J. Janssen
• Bill “snuffy” smith
• Claude anderson
• John santana
• Don ayers
• “R.Bill” Hardin
• Bruce Brown

“We All Are Twenty-Thirtians” Song

Video

p1060328Did you know there is an official song of Active 20-30? Actually there is a whole songbook of songs. But this one first caught my interest a couple of years ago. Before I even came across the lyrics, I was talking 20-30 with my grandfather (Carl Spilman, a past member of Sacramento #1). He started singing a song that he said was always sung at meetings. I was lucky enough to catch him singing and record it on camera before he passed away.

Auburn #19 is the only club I know of that continues the tradition of singing this song at meetings.

 

We All Are Twenty-Thirtians

Music and Words by Cliff Mott

p1060329

We are Twenty Thirtians and here’s our motto,
It is Youth to be Served must Serve. When we do things
We do them right Any big job is our delight. You!
Will! Hear! Us! Always boosting our community
That will make us grow and keep expanding. From California to New York cause “Sincerity
Of Service is our Slogan for Success”
That makes a Twenty Thirty Club!

Remembering our 20-30 Founder: Paul Claiborne

pul(1902-1969)

Sacramento Bee Newspaper, 15 April 1969

AUBURN—Masonic funeral services will be held at 2 PM tomorrow in the Chapel of the Hills for Paul Claiborne Sr., 67, founder of the 20-30 International and longtime business and civic leader of Placer County. A native of Gas City, IN, he died Sunday after a heart attack at home. He had been a resident of California for 65 years and moved to Auburn from Sacramento in 1926.

His widow yesterday received a telegram from President Richard Nixon, a member of the 20-30 Club in California, expressing regret. The telegram stated: “Pat and I were distressed to hear of Paul’s untimely death. We have lost a dear, old friend and no words could convey how deeply he will be missed. Please know that our thoughts are with you. We pray that God may bless and strengthen you through this sad and lonely time.”

Claiborne, who was president and general manager of the Placer Savings and Loan Association which he founded in 1947, held memberships in the Auburn Rotary Club, Yreka Lodge No. 16, F and AM, Delta Chapter No. 27 Royal Order of Masons, Auburn Commandery Order of Knights Templar, Ben Ali Shrine Temple, Sacramento Court No. 119, Royal Order of Jesters, Placer Shrine Club of Auburn, Sacramento Consistory of Scottish Rights Masons, Auburn Elks, Auburn Dam Committee, Auburn Area Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe Club of Auburn, Sierra View Country Club of Roseville, Placer County Board of Realtors, Grandfathers Club of Sacramento, and Eagles Lodge of Auburn.

He was a former member of the Placer County Republicans Central Committee, past president of the Tahoe Council of the Auburn Area Boy Scouts, a former member of the Auburn City Planning Commission and the Auburn Union Elementary School Board, and past president of the Golden Chain Council.

He is survived by his widow, Mary; son, Paul Jr. of Auburn; daughters, Merrilee Clark of Auburn and Joycelyn Aronson of Cupertino, Santa Clara County; brothers, Carl of Carmichael, Lloyd of Roseville, and Burneth of Southgate, Los Angeles County; sisters, Ruth Hunter and Erma Piches, both of Roseville, Vieva Nichols of Orangevale and Mrs. Dale Foster of Fountain City, TN; and eight grandchildren.

The family requests that any remembrance be sent to the 20-30 Club, Project Deaf or the Rotary Foundation.

Found on website: http://www.cagenweb.com/placer/Obits/Obits_C.htm