August 1960, 20-30 Club President’s Message

The President’s Message

By Clint McClure

The DATE of August 1, 1960 will be remembered as the most significant in our history since the founding of 20-30, for on that day the merger of Active and 20-30 International became a reality. Both groups will retain their present administrative structures until the joint International convention in Tucson next summer, but for all other intents and purposes we are now one combine organization.

I was most fortunate in being able to attend the Active International Convention in Calgary, Alberta last month, and to see the Active delegates unanimously vote to merge with 20-30. Every International officer making a report to the convention recommended the merger, and the enthusiasm for it displayed by the delegates and members was outstanding.

Had I not seen the Active banners and badges, I would have been sure that I was attending a 20-30 convention. Their methods of operating are identical with ours, and the Active spirit is almost unbelievable. It will be a wonderful experience associating with them in Tucson and for many years thereafter.

The most impressive program Active has is that of public speaking. It has often been said that many men have excellent ideas, but they die without seeing the light of day because few men are able to express themselves. This is the core of the Active program, and through a series of contests on the local, district and International level, Activians are given a thorough schooling in this self-betterment technique.

There are many other practices and procedures in Active that will certainly benefit our combined organization. In order to realize these benefits, we must begin now to think Active 20-30, work Active 20-30, talk Active 20-30 and be Active 20-30!

Clint McClure. “The President’s Message.” The Twenty-Thirtian, August 1960, p4.

I’ll have 3 tacos, a water, and here’s a 20-30 Bell

I loved hearing this story and sharing it with others. It takes place in June 2013, where a nice young lady came up to a taco stand at the El Dorado County Fair (California). The stand is always manned by Active 20-30 Cub of Hangtown #43. She said “I’ll have 3 tacos, a water, and here I want your club to have this.”

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Ryan West (Past President of Hangtown #43) expanded on the story; “The girl who gave it to me said it had been in her grandfather’s possession for several years (decades probably). He passed away around 10 years ago and it has just been with her grandma since and they wanted to try to get it back to where it belongs or a good home.”

I have done some Google research on the names etched on the bell and it is looking like it might have belonged to Palo Alto #25.

Here are the names of the “Presidents” on the bell:wp_20130807_001
(in no particular order)
• Jack Hansen
• Bill Johnson
• Warner Morgan
• Bob Hollandsworth
• Ben Gibson
• Hank Nordberg
• Chris Bernard
• Frank Pfyl
• Jack Merrill
• Jack J. Janssen
• Bill “snuffy” smith
• Claude anderson
• John santana
• Don ayers
• “R.Bill” Hardin
• Bruce Brown

“We All Are Twenty-Thirtians” Song

Video

p1060328Did you know there is an official song of Active 20-30? Actually there is a whole songbook of songs. But this one first caught my interest a couple of years ago. Before I even came across the lyrics, I was talking 20-30 with my grandfather (Carl Spilman, a past member of Sacramento #1). He started singing a song that he said was always sung at meetings. I was lucky enough to catch him singing and record it on camera before he passed away.

Auburn #19 is the only club I know of that continues the tradition of singing this song at meetings.

 

We All Are Twenty-Thirtians

Music and Words by Cliff Mott

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We are Twenty Thirtians and here’s our motto,
It is Youth to be Served must Serve. When we do things
We do them right Any big job is our delight. You!
Will! Hear! Us! Always boosting our community
That will make us grow and keep expanding. From California to New York cause “Sincerity
Of Service is our Slogan for Success”
That makes a Twenty Thirty Club!

Remembering our 20-30 Founder: Paul Claiborne

pul(1902-1969)

Sacramento Bee Newspaper, 15 April 1969

AUBURN—Masonic funeral services will be held at 2 PM tomorrow in the Chapel of the Hills for Paul Claiborne Sr., 67, founder of the 20-30 International and longtime business and civic leader of Placer County. A native of Gas City, IN, he died Sunday after a heart attack at home. He had been a resident of California for 65 years and moved to Auburn from Sacramento in 1926.

His widow yesterday received a telegram from President Richard Nixon, a member of the 20-30 Club in California, expressing regret. The telegram stated: “Pat and I were distressed to hear of Paul’s untimely death. We have lost a dear, old friend and no words could convey how deeply he will be missed. Please know that our thoughts are with you. We pray that God may bless and strengthen you through this sad and lonely time.”

Claiborne, who was president and general manager of the Placer Savings and Loan Association which he founded in 1947, held memberships in the Auburn Rotary Club, Yreka Lodge No. 16, F and AM, Delta Chapter No. 27 Royal Order of Masons, Auburn Commandery Order of Knights Templar, Ben Ali Shrine Temple, Sacramento Court No. 119, Royal Order of Jesters, Placer Shrine Club of Auburn, Sacramento Consistory of Scottish Rights Masons, Auburn Elks, Auburn Dam Committee, Auburn Area Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe Club of Auburn, Sierra View Country Club of Roseville, Placer County Board of Realtors, Grandfathers Club of Sacramento, and Eagles Lodge of Auburn.

He was a former member of the Placer County Republicans Central Committee, past president of the Tahoe Council of the Auburn Area Boy Scouts, a former member of the Auburn City Planning Commission and the Auburn Union Elementary School Board, and past president of the Golden Chain Council.

He is survived by his widow, Mary; son, Paul Jr. of Auburn; daughters, Merrilee Clark of Auburn and Joycelyn Aronson of Cupertino, Santa Clara County; brothers, Carl of Carmichael, Lloyd of Roseville, and Burneth of Southgate, Los Angeles County; sisters, Ruth Hunter and Erma Piches, both of Roseville, Vieva Nichols of Orangevale and Mrs. Dale Foster of Fountain City, TN; and eight grandchildren.

The family requests that any remembrance be sent to the 20-30 Club, Project Deaf or the Rotary Foundation.

Found on website: http://www.cagenweb.com/placer/Obits/Obits_C.htm

Snooping Into Active 20-30’s Past?

I LOVE history, especially when I can find a more personal connection to it. Knowing that my grandparents and parents were members of Sacramento #1, made me curious to learn more about this organization’s past.

Here are two articles that I found had some interesting information, the first is an article the day after the very first official meeting of the 20-30 club and the second one mentions the 50th anniversary celebration where there was an explanation of the hourglass symbol (interesting to note that things haven’t changed much with a social hour, followed by a dinner where likely there were speeches and announcements, followed by dancing).  I might be the only one that’s jumping for joy at this find but it is exciting to be able to solve mysteries of the past and learn how things came about and what happened. Enjoy!

Active 20.30 article1a

Organization of 20-30 Club is Completed

Final organization of the 20-30 Club, composed of men between the ages of 20 and 30 years engaged in all lines of work, yesterday was completed at a meeting held at the chamber of commerce, when officers were elected and constitution and by-laws were approved.

The officers of the club are: Paul Claiborne, president; A.B. Frank, vice president; Carroll Couture, second vice president; C.J. McBride, secretary; Joe Rohl, treasurer, Jack Foale, sergeant at arms; directors, E. Casey, R. Cohen, Homer Dunn, R.Kirby, and Clarence Breuner.

The next meeting of the club will be held December 28th at 8 p.m. at the chamber of commerce.

A feature of the program yesterday was the appearance of Verne Vernill, female impersonator, who sang several songs.

 Sacramento Union, 20 Dec. 1922:  22.

Active 20.30 article7

20-30 Club Was Born In Sacramento

“Twenty-Thirty is Fifty” is the theme of a dinner dance which will be held Saturday in the Woodlake Inn in observance of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the 20-30 club.

More than 500 members and former members and their wives will be in attendance at the affair, which will start with a 6 p.m. social hour followed by dinner and dancing.

Toasts and messages of welcome will be offered by David K. Murphy, president of the club; J. Edward Cain, president in 1927, and Robert Baumgart, who held the office in 1953.

Gene Pendergast is chairman of arrangements.

It was in 1922 that 20-30 Club, long an international organization, had its beginnings. The late Paul Claiborne conceived the idea of forming a service club with a membership that would consist only of young men and with goals directed toward helping the youth of the community – two needs that were not being filled at the time by senior service clubs in the Sacramento area.

Along with Earle G. Casey, Alfred B Franke, Charles G McBride and Marshall A Page, Claiborne took his idea to Mitchel Nathan, then president of the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

The first meeting was held Dec. 19 and the hourglass, a symbol of the passage of youth, was adopted as the emblem.

Soon after the Sacramento club had established itself, 20-30 began to expand into new areas. Clubs were formed in San Bernardino, San Francisco, Hayward, Tracy, and Oakland.

By 1941 charters were granted to clubs from California to Indiana, from Washington to New Mexico. In 1946, with the chartering of a club in Juarez, Mexico, 20-30 became an international organization and at a “victory” Convention, the official name of the association of 20-30 Clubs was changed to 20-30 International and the age limit advanced to 35.

In the years to follow, expansion began in the far west and Southwest. Clubs also spread through Mexico and into all the Central American countries and parts of South America.

Nineteen Twenty-Two was also the birth date of another service club. Some 700 miles of Sacramento, in Aberdeen, Wash., another group of young men had hit upon Claibornes’ idea and formed an organization which they named “Active”. Throughout the years of expansion both 20-30 and Active were drawn along similar paths. In 1959 President Norm Morrison of 20-30 International and President Ken Helling of Active International proposed that the two almost-identical clubs should merge. On August 1, 1960, Active and 20-30 became known as Active 20-30 International.

Throughout its fifty years of service to the community and country, 20-30 members (or more recently Active 20-30 members) have provided aid and service to youth and provided a training ground for young businessmen.

Sacramento Bee, 26 Nov. 1972:  W-1+.