3rd Generation Member in Sacramento #1

(REPOST from 2013)

Active Member:
David Brandenburger, 3rd generation

Any offices you held/hold in 20-30? President, Fall 2012

Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in? Did they hold any offices in 20-30? His Grandfather, Sheldon, was a member in the mid 1930’s. And his father, Steve, was a member and on the Board of Directors in the late 1960’s.

If you are a generational member or know of someone who is, please contact me (I’d love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

  • From [insert club]
  • Active member [insert name] is [#] generation. Any offices you held/hold in 20-30?
  • Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
  • Did they hold any offices in 20-30?
  • Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects? Fun tidbits?
  • Can I get a photo of active member to use and, if possible, the other family members?

You can be as brief or as descriptive as you would like. Either way, I am looking forward to hearing from all the generational members out there.

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National Project: Back to School Shopping Spree Origins

Other 20-30 Club national projects:
Universal Fingerprinting
Safety Sallys (putting up warning signs at school’s crosswalks)

Curious to know about when clubs started shopping sprees? Or maybe just wanting to know when it became our current United States National Project?

Members from Sacramento #1 visited the re-chartered Stockton Club around 1974. That club was hosting a back to school shopping spree. They thought it a great idea and brought it back to Sacramento, where a back to school spree happened around 1980.*

More and more clubs starting holding their own shopping sprees and when a new National Project committee was formed in 1993, they ended up deciding on having this be the one that they felt clubs would get behind.

Kevin Thompson from Torrance, California “ran for National President on the campaign of a National Project. My campaign speech included … “I have a dream that on the same day, every year, thousands of Active 20-30 members together with thousands of needy children and their families will gather with the purpose of obtaining new clothes and supplies to return to school.” The vision was to create a united cause as previously Active 20-30 did not have a united National project.” He became the National President in the 1994-1995 term and got to work on making his goal a reality. He hoped to reach out to stores like Mervyn’s or Target and get a corporate deal for across the U.S.**

Back-to-School Shopping Spree

The National Project Committee met with Jan O’Laughlan, Community Projects/Public Affairs Manager, Mervyn’s, and established Saturday, August 3rd as the Active 20-30 Back-to-School Shopping Spree. This will be in concert with Mervyn’s fifth Annual ChildSpree.

With your club’s involvement and all of our clubs across the country, it is our hope to provide clothing and school supplies to over 1500 needy children on this very special day.

It has been a three year endeavor to find a project that all of our clubs could participate in no matter what size the club or how much money the club decided to spend on the project.

The National Office has a sample letter that can be used to send to your local Mervyn’s store as well as “Child Release Form” and a sample set up sheet to give you an idea on how the project should be run.

Each Mervyn’s store has available $1500 matching funds for this purpose. Mervyn’s has requested that each Active 20-30 Club contact the local store to submit a request for these matching funds. While there may be a competing non-profit agency also requesting the allocated funds, Mervyn’s is very aware of our national effort and it would therefor behoove us to submit our requests as soon as possible.

Upon receipt of the club’s request and approval of the $1500 matching funds, Mervyn’s will also provide a very detailed “How-to-Kit” to augment what you will receive from the National Office. Mervyn’s will additionally provide a 10% discount for Active 20-30 the day of the event as well as any sales or special promotions that may be going on.

It is the hope of your National Board of Directors that all of our clubs will participate in this worthwhile National project. However, we know it takes time for new projects to get incorporated into a club’s schedule. But certainly for those clubs who can’t participate this year, they will be able to join the others clubs in 1997.***

3rd Generation Member in Greater Sacramento #1032

Now that I came up with this spotlight format, guess I could do mine.

Active member:
Michele Spilman, 3rd generation

Any offices you held/hold in 20-30? Currently the President of Greater Sacramento #1032 and in my  6th year as USA & Canada National History Chair.  It’s fun to now be able to say I’m also a 3rd Generation Club President. A first for Greater Sacramento #1032. 

Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in? Did they hold any offices in 20-30? My grandfather, Carl Spilman, was a member of Sacramento #1. My grandmother, Helen, was a member of the Sacramento 20-30ettes and a president.

A cousin of my dad’s (Brian Holdener) was a member of Sacramento #1 and was his sponsor into the club.

My father, Craig Spilman, was a member of Sacramento #1, Man of the Year, and Past Active Life. My mother, Dale, was a member of the 20-30ettes and a president, Woman of the Year, Past Active Life, and managed the National Office for two years.

Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects? Fun tidbits? They enjoyed National, International and WOCO conventions in Anaheim, Sacramento, Eugene Oregon, and Santo Domingo. Also enjoyed a WOCO tour in England/Scotland making many friends in the WOCO community.

My dad was known for his pyrotechnics in meetings to make announcements or just as surprises. Always fun!!If you are a generational member or know of someone who is, please contact me (I’d love to recognize and feature your history) – mchlspil@gmail.com

  • From [insert club]
  • Active member [insert name] is [#] generation. Any offices you held/hold in 20-30?
  • Relation, name, and what club were the other members of the family in?
  • Did they hold any offices in 20-30?
  • Any other noteworthy accomplishments? Big projects? Fun tidbits?
  • Can I get a photo of active member to use and, if possible, the other family members?

You can be as brief or as descriptive as you would like. Either way, I am looking forward to hearing from all the generational members out there.

PROJECT: A Gathering of Eagles

eagles-03Pssst … Buddy, ya wanna buy an eagle? Rent one? How about a long term loan?

This is what the US Department of Interior offered the Sacramento City Zoo; a permanent loan of several pairs of Golden Eagles, provided an appropriate display area be created. And that’s when the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento go involved.

A year ago (May ’73) Bill Meeker, a Director of the city zoo, was invited to speak before the Sacramento club on “What’s New At The Zoo?” After hearing about the development of the zoo into one of the most formidable for a community the size of Sacramento, and about Meeker’s plans for future zoo development, he was invited to make a presentation before the club’s Projects and Charities Committee.

Meeker advised the P/C Committee that in order to keep pace with other similar zoos, and in order to maintain public interest and attendance, a new exhibit should be developed every one or two years. Meeker added that there were no funds available for expansion. He therefore envisioned his best source for zoo expansion would be through the Sacramento area’s service clubs. He felt that if one major club, such as Active 20-30, would provide the first new exhibit, this would be the initiative for other service clubs to build additional new exhibits.

Meeker introduced his plans to expand the zoo with a new ornithology area to include many new aviary exhibits. The first being the new eagle aerie for our national bird. He showed the P/C Committee an illustration of a new eagle display shaped like a giant canary cage and said the cost would be approximately $1,500.00 for material and construction. The committee suggested the plan ought to be revised to a larger more natural exhibit with high rock formations, trees, etc. Meeker thought this was a great idea but too expensive since it would boost the cost to around $20,000.00.

Nevertheless, the Sacramento club believed they could build such a cage, using the resources available through its own members, and voted to go ahead with the project.

eagles-01

After the zoo provided the basic design, several engineers from the club determined what the structural requirements would be and their approximate costs. They estimated if the club could obtain the majority of the materials by donations from the community, the cost could be kept within $2,000.00 … including food and beer. After this, several club members in the construction industry determined the time and manpower requirements. They estimated ten to fifteen members working on the project for five or six weekends would complete the entire job.

An “Eagle Cage Committee” was formed with two co-chairmen: Steve Whichard, who is a partner in Whichard Construction, to provide the expertise and round up materials; and Ned Strong, from the mortgage business, to provide manpower.

The exhibit was planned to include a 25-foot high heavy-gauge screened area which could best be framed with telephone poles. The then-president of the Sacramento club (ahem) just happened to be employed by Pacific Telephone and was able to obtain enough poles for the exhibit, which the telephone company also placed. Through members in the construction industry, cement for the foundation, lumber, nails, metal eagles-02doors for the building, and many other materials were provided. Another major construction item was the framing and gunnite material to create the rock-mountain structure. Steve Whichard was able to have all of the material, as well as its construction, donated by the Northern California Lethe and Plaster Contractors Association. This, obviously saved the club several thousand dollars. All other labor, in addition to tools such as forklifts, power equipment, hammers and pliers, was provided by club members.

The cage took seven working weekends to complete, starting last October and ending in April. Dedication will be May 23, 1974.

Sacramento City Zoo now has a new eagle aerie at no cost to the city, valued at $20,000.00, because of the initiative, imagination and effective use of resources of the Active 20-30 Club of Sacramento.

Hefflefinger, Dean. “A Gathering of Eagles.” Active 20-30. April/May 1974: 12-13. Print.

eagles

“We All Are Twenty-Thirtians” Song

Video

p1060328Did you know there is an official song of Active 20-30? Actually there is a whole songbook of songs. But this one first caught my interest a couple of years ago. Before I even came across the lyrics, I was talking 20-30 with my grandfather (Carl Spilman, a past member of Sacramento #1). He started singing a song that he said was always sung at meetings. I was lucky enough to catch him singing and record it on camera before he passed away.

Auburn #19 is the only club I know of that continues the tradition of singing this song at meetings.

 

We All Are Twenty-Thirtians

Music and Words by Cliff Mott

p1060329

We are Twenty Thirtians and here’s our motto,
It is Youth to be Served must Serve. When we do things
We do them right Any big job is our delight. You!
Will! Hear! Us! Always boosting our community
That will make us grow and keep expanding. From California to New York cause “Sincerity
Of Service is our Slogan for Success”
That makes a Twenty Thirty Club!

Remembering our 20-30 Founder: Paul Claiborne

pul(1902-1969)

Sacramento Bee Newspaper, 15 April 1969

AUBURN—Masonic funeral services will be held at 2 PM tomorrow in the Chapel of the Hills for Paul Claiborne Sr., 67, founder of the 20-30 International and longtime business and civic leader of Placer County. A native of Gas City, IN, he died Sunday after a heart attack at home. He had been a resident of California for 65 years and moved to Auburn from Sacramento in 1926.

His widow yesterday received a telegram from President Richard Nixon, a member of the 20-30 Club in California, expressing regret. The telegram stated: “Pat and I were distressed to hear of Paul’s untimely death. We have lost a dear, old friend and no words could convey how deeply he will be missed. Please know that our thoughts are with you. We pray that God may bless and strengthen you through this sad and lonely time.”

Claiborne, who was president and general manager of the Placer Savings and Loan Association which he founded in 1947, held memberships in the Auburn Rotary Club, Yreka Lodge No. 16, F and AM, Delta Chapter No. 27 Royal Order of Masons, Auburn Commandery Order of Knights Templar, Ben Ali Shrine Temple, Sacramento Court No. 119, Royal Order of Jesters, Placer Shrine Club of Auburn, Sacramento Consistory of Scottish Rights Masons, Auburn Elks, Auburn Dam Committee, Auburn Area Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe Club of Auburn, Sierra View Country Club of Roseville, Placer County Board of Realtors, Grandfathers Club of Sacramento, and Eagles Lodge of Auburn.

He was a former member of the Placer County Republicans Central Committee, past president of the Tahoe Council of the Auburn Area Boy Scouts, a former member of the Auburn City Planning Commission and the Auburn Union Elementary School Board, and past president of the Golden Chain Council.

He is survived by his widow, Mary; son, Paul Jr. of Auburn; daughters, Merrilee Clark of Auburn and Joycelyn Aronson of Cupertino, Santa Clara County; brothers, Carl of Carmichael, Lloyd of Roseville, and Burneth of Southgate, Los Angeles County; sisters, Ruth Hunter and Erma Piches, both of Roseville, Vieva Nichols of Orangevale and Mrs. Dale Foster of Fountain City, TN; and eight grandchildren.

The family requests that any remembrance be sent to the 20-30 Club, Project Deaf or the Rotary Foundation.

Found on website: http://www.cagenweb.com/placer/Obits/Obits_C.htm

Snooping Into Active 20-30’s Past?

I LOVE history, especially when I can find a more personal connection to it. Knowing that my grandparents and parents were members of Sacramento #1, made me curious to learn more about this organization’s past.

Here are two articles that I found had some interesting information, the first is an article the day after the very first official meeting of the 20-30 club and the second one mentions the 50th anniversary celebration where there was an explanation of the hourglass symbol (interesting to note that things haven’t changed much with a social hour, followed by a dinner where likely there were speeches and announcements, followed by dancing).  I might be the only one that’s jumping for joy at this find but it is exciting to be able to solve mysteries of the past and learn how things came about and what happened. Enjoy!

Active 20.30 article1a

Organization of 20-30 Club is Completed

Final organization of the 20-30 Club, composed of men between the ages of 20 and 30 years engaged in all lines of work, yesterday was completed at a meeting held at the chamber of commerce, when officers were elected and constitution and by-laws were approved.

The officers of the club are: Paul Claiborne, president; A.B. Frank, vice president; Carroll Couture, second vice president; C.J. McBride, secretary; Joe Rohl, treasurer, Jack Foale, sergeant at arms; directors, E. Casey, R. Cohen, Homer Dunn, R.Kirby, and Clarence Breuner.

The next meeting of the club will be held December 28th at 8 p.m. at the chamber of commerce.

A feature of the program yesterday was the appearance of Verne Vernill, female impersonator, who sang several songs.

 Sacramento Union, 20 Dec. 1922:  22.

Active 20.30 article7

20-30 Club Was Born In Sacramento

“Twenty-Thirty is Fifty” is the theme of a dinner dance which will be held Saturday in the Woodlake Inn in observance of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the 20-30 club.

More than 500 members and former members and their wives will be in attendance at the affair, which will start with a 6 p.m. social hour followed by dinner and dancing.

Toasts and messages of welcome will be offered by David K. Murphy, president of the club; J. Edward Cain, president in 1927, and Robert Baumgart, who held the office in 1953.

Gene Pendergast is chairman of arrangements.

It was in 1922 that 20-30 Club, long an international organization, had its beginnings. The late Paul Claiborne conceived the idea of forming a service club with a membership that would consist only of young men and with goals directed toward helping the youth of the community – two needs that were not being filled at the time by senior service clubs in the Sacramento area.

Along with Earle G. Casey, Alfred B Franke, Charles G McBride and Marshall A Page, Claiborne took his idea to Mitchel Nathan, then president of the Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

The first meeting was held Dec. 19 and the hourglass, a symbol of the passage of youth, was adopted as the emblem.

Soon after the Sacramento club had established itself, 20-30 began to expand into new areas. Clubs were formed in San Bernardino, San Francisco, Hayward, Tracy, and Oakland.

By 1941 charters were granted to clubs from California to Indiana, from Washington to New Mexico. In 1946, with the chartering of a club in Juarez, Mexico, 20-30 became an international organization and at a “victory” Convention, the official name of the association of 20-30 Clubs was changed to 20-30 International and the age limit advanced to 35.

In the years to follow, expansion began in the far west and Southwest. Clubs also spread through Mexico and into all the Central American countries and parts of South America.

Nineteen Twenty-Two was also the birth date of another service club. Some 700 miles of Sacramento, in Aberdeen, Wash., another group of young men had hit upon Claibornes’ idea and formed an organization which they named “Active”. Throughout the years of expansion both 20-30 and Active were drawn along similar paths. In 1959 President Norm Morrison of 20-30 International and President Ken Helling of Active International proposed that the two almost-identical clubs should merge. On August 1, 1960, Active and 20-30 became known as Active 20-30 International.

Throughout its fifty years of service to the community and country, 20-30 members (or more recently Active 20-30 members) have provided aid and service to youth and provided a training ground for young businessmen.

Sacramento Bee, 26 Nov. 1972:  W-1+.