History of Active 20-30 International (part 2)

The History of Active 20-30 International

(quick recap of how two clubs merged into one)

Active 20-30 International had its actual beginnings in 1922 when young men in two widely separated communities of the United States saw the need for a service club for young men. They found that established service clubs were dominated by older men, run by older men and whose officers were invariably much older men.

This realization led those groups of ambitious young men to stray away from existing groups and organize a club of their own, a club wherein young men would have a chance to engage actively in service to their communities; a club where young ideas, backed by enthusiasm and the energy of youth, could share in civic responsibilities on an equal basis with clubs composed of older men.

These pioneers of young men’s service clubs were located in Aberdeen, Washington where Active International was formed and in Sacramento, California, where 20-30 International had its beginnings.

Both 20-30 International and Active International where chartered members of the World Council of Young Men’s Service Clubs. John Armenia, Joe Crowe and Arnie Scheldt of Active and Dr. James Vernetti, Henry Heyl and Ray Fletcher of 20-30 were among those who fostered the World Council movement up to its formal beginning in 1945.

In 1959 President Norm Morrison of 20-30 and President Ken Helling of Active exchanged a letter and renewed the long standing proposal that these two almost identical young men’s service clubs should merge.

Throughout 1959 and 1960 meetings were held between the two groups, culminating in the proposed Constitution, and resolution to be presented to the 1960 conventions of each organization.

At the 20-30 International Convention held in Santa Cruz, CA in 1960, the delegates unanimously adopted the merger proposal and the Constitution. One month later, the delegates at the Active international Convention in Calgary, Alberta, also unanimously adopted the propositions.

Therefore, on August 1, 1960, Active and 20-30 became Active 20- 30 International.

During the year of the merger, Active 20-30 had 7,500 members from 365 clubs in Canada, USA, Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Ecuador and Cuba.

The first convention of Active 20-30 International was held in Tucson, AZ, July 10-14, 1961, where the Constitution and By-Laws were officially adopted.

Jack Kummert was elected President; Federico G. Lugo as First Vice-President; James Robertson as Second Vice-President. Clint McClure and Owen Barnes, the last presidents of 20-30 and Active respectively, stayed as members of the International Directors Council as Immediate Past Presidents.

Other members of the First Council of Directors of Active 20-30 International were: Ray Manges, Area 1; Norm Jensen, Area 2; Skeet Glidewell, Area 3; Forrest K. Stewart, Area 4; Roy Stype, Area 5; Emilio Pérez-Banuet, Area 6; Joaquin Bours, Associate Director of Area 6; Angel Moreno, Area 7 and Bob Baumgartner, Area 8.

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August 1960, 20-30 Club President’s Message

The President’s Message

By Clint McClure

The DATE of August 1, 1960 will be remembered as the most significant in our history since the founding of 20-30, for on that day the merger of Active and 20-30 International became a reality. Both groups will retain their present administrative structures until the joint International convention in Tucson next summer, but for all other intents and purposes we are now one combine organization.

I was most fortunate in being able to attend the Active International Convention in Calgary, Alberta last month, and to see the Active delegates unanimously vote to merge with 20-30. Every International officer making a report to the convention recommended the merger, and the enthusiasm for it displayed by the delegates and members was outstanding.

Had I not seen the Active banners and badges, I would have been sure that I was attending a 20-30 convention. Their methods of operating are identical with ours, and the Active spirit is almost unbelievable. It will be a wonderful experience associating with them in Tucson and for many years thereafter.

The most impressive program Active has is that of public speaking. It has often been said that many men have excellent ideas, but they die without seeing the light of day because few men are able to express themselves. This is the core of the Active program, and through a series of contests on the local, district and International level, Activians are given a thorough schooling in this self-betterment technique.

There are many other practices and procedures in Active that will certainly benefit our combined organization. In order to realize these benefits, we must begin now to think Active 20-30, work Active 20-30, talk Active 20-30 and be Active 20-30!

Clint McClure. “The President’s Message.” The Twenty-Thirtian, August 1960, p4.