20-30 Club World War II Memorial Plaque

During the Twentieth Annual “Victory” Convention, August 19 – 25, 1946 in Sacramento, California a memorial plaque was reveled.

On Wednesday, August 21st, represented the opening Plenary Session in the State Assembly Chambers. The location of this gather was particularly convenient and appropriate. The sea of delegate’s serious faces silently announced to the leaders in the rostrum that they were ready for business and prepared to map the year’s future. National President Jim Vernetti presided and after “America” and the Pledge to the Flag, Past National President Abbe Strunck of San Antonio, Texas, gave the invocation. Committee and officer reports followed until the time had arrived for the Period of Remembrance for the 20-30ians who had given their lives in World War II. The audience consisted principally of delegates and officials with a few 20-30ians and visitors who had realized such a ceremony was to take place. In view of the program which followed, absolutely every person in attendance at the convention should have been present because without having witnessed the Period of Remembrance they returned to their homes without the memory of something which would never leave them. The celebrated Convention Bureau Stringed Ensemble with its women’s choir augmented the solemnly conducted ceremony consisting of Invocation, Unveiling of the Memorial, reading of the names of the casualties, the Eulogy and “Lest We Forget”. The Creation Hymn, Green Cathedral, Lord’s Prayer, My Buddy, and Day is Done, was sung in the soft clear tones of bells tolling in the distance. Only the light tap of the gavel opened the half-hour period, and only “Taps” and another light touch of the gavel closed it. The assembly slowly wended its way out, speechless and silent in reverence of that which had just been witnessed.

(Twenty-Thirtian, October 1946, pp11-12)

In Memoriam

As listed in January 1946 issue.
The Association of 20-30 Clubs, permanent War Memorial plaque with the names of war casualties inscribed thereon.
54 clubs reported 75 casualties.

Rank – Name – Location – Club Number

  • T/Sgt. Jesse W. Andrew – Alice #239
  • Lt. Robert M. Arthur – Corpus Christi #199
  • Lt. Herb Baker – Sacramento #1
  • Sgt. Robert E. Baly – El Centro #115
  • CM 2/c William E. Bates – Beaumont #185
  • Joe Bates – Fresno #12
  • 2nd Lt. Mayo Bills – Houston #192
  • Joseph H. Boyle – Madera #160
  • Capt. Frank D. Bradford – Fresno #12
  • Lt. (j.g.) Donald R. Brown – Healdsburg #215
  • 1st Lt. Loren Bubar – San Luis Obispo #93
  • Lt. Wilmer L. Buzan – Corona #26
  • Lawrence Chenoweth, Jt. – Bakersfield #27
  • Pvt. Kenneth Cole – Flagstaff #142
  • Chf. Pharm. Nick Colabella – Santa Rosa #50
  • SC/2 Edwin J. Cook – Redding #143
  • Pfc. Woodrow Cornett – S.W. Los Angeles #206
  • Joe DeClark – S.W. Los Angeles #206
  • Duray Dorsey – San Bernardino #3
  • Lt. Ernest Emery – Kingman #157
  • Pfc. John W.R. Engholm – Gallup #180
  • Maj. John Evans – Seattle #215
  • Lt. Pierre Ferran – Napa #57
  • Claude Fleming – Carlsbad #202
  • Lt. James Fowler – Santa Barbara #42
  • Warren Feeland – Bakersfield #27
  • Robert Fulton – Idaho Falls #114
  • Robert Gardner – Patterson #91
  • Lt. Daniel H. Gatti – Westwood #200
  • Lt. Waldorf George – Pomona #9
  • Lt. S. Kenneth Graff – Alhambra #117
  • 1st Lt. Edward Hampton – Taft #77
  • 2nd Lt. O.W. Handy – Riverside #10
  • S/Sgt. Norbert Hans – Redding #143
  • Sgt. Preston Harris – Corpus Christi #199
  • 1st Lt. William L. Hart, Jr. – Kingman #157
  • Lt. John H. Hartsfield – Gallup #180
  • Charles Heller – San Antonio #167
  • 1st Lt. George B. Herbert – Houston #192
  • Corp. William L. Hoyt – Ontario #13
  • Lt. George Hudnutt, Jr. – Sacramento #1
  • Edward J. Jacobs – Flagstaff #142
  • S 1/c Arthur F. Johnsen – Huntington Park #16
  • Lt. Leonard A. Johnson – Corpus Christi #199
  • Lt. George Jones – Sacramento #1
  • Dave Kaufman – San Antonio #167
  • Lt. A.S. Kidd – Santa Monica #233
  • Ernest Krohnert – Mt. Shasta #203
  • Ens. William Laws – Santa Rosa #50
  • Lt. Robert T. Marquess – Carlsbad #202
  • 1st Lt. Pike B. Martin, Jr – Fresno #12
  • Lt. Admiral McDonald – San Antonio #167
  • Maynard Melmick – Van Nuys #207
  • Lt. Byron Michaelson – Huntington Park #16
  • George Moore – Artesia #231
  • Capt. John Mulvaney, Jr. – Alameda #183
  • Sgt. Floyd Oehlerking – Long Beach #29
  • Lt. Frederick H. Palmer – Palo Alto #25
  • Pfc. Sanator J. Passarino – Healdsburg #205
  • Pfc. Clifford E. Patton – San Francisco-Park Presidio #246
  • Lt. William H. Paulsen, Jr. – Salinas #44
  • Ivan Richardson – Bakersfield #27
  • Richard Riley, M.D. – Albuquerque #103
  • Lt. Glen Salisbury – Idaho Falls #114
  • Harry Schellhase – San Antonio #167
  • Lee J. Shudde – Houston #192
  • Rm 1/c David Solari – Chowchilla #249
  • Pvt. Joseph Spina – Los Banos #108
  • Lt. Jack R. Stewart – San Antonio #167
  • Corp. Garth B. Tillotsen – Ogden #179
  • Pfc. Marshall Weimer – Napa #57
  • Lt. Stanley Wells – Wilmington #177
  • Charles Wiese – Patterson #91
  • Lt. Jack Wiles, Jr. – Burbank #127
  • Lt. (j.g.) David Wright – Sacramento #1

As listed in May 1946 issue.
Additional war casualties have been reported to the Association of 20-30 Clubs. Following names will be added to the plaque.

Rank – Name – Location – Club Number

  • Foster Beal – Clovis #225
  • Bud Edwards – Highland Park #226
  • Lt. Jack Hodgins – Santa Barbara #42
  • Bob Jensen – Highland Park #226
  • RM 3/c Howard Keffer – Brawley #150
  • Bob Maxon – Highland Park #226
  • Lt. Col. Herbert Mills – El Paso #96
  • Ray McGinley – Santa Ana #22
  • Lt. Don Riley Powell – Fallon #40
  • 2d. Lt. Bert Ross – Santa Rosa #50
  • Carl Schreider – Clovis #225
  • Dr. H.J. Seyfarth – Turlock #68
  • John Shield – Clovis #225
  • S/Sgt. John C. Walden – El Paso #96

 

Origins of a Tradition: Pennies A Day

Penny-A-Day Cans Sent to Clubs

Most of you are asking yourself “What is Penny-A-Day?” Recently we sent each club a new” Penny-

A-Day can for use at your meetings. That’s all you do with the can – pass it around the room and the members deposit any loose change. This money is then presented to the delegates at the National Convention to be placed in a restricted account at the National level for charity purposes.

But first, let me tell you how it all began. In the 1950’s, when the organization was still Active 20-30 International, with no National associations, the funds from the clubs went to fight Rheumatic Fever and funds were deposited into the International Rheumatic Fever Foundation.

At the 1965 International Convention, the delegates voted to change their support to children who were deaf. They set up the Active 20-30 International Charity Foundation, Inc. and the project was known as “Project Deaf”. The cans appeared on the scene in 1968.

In 1974, the International organization changed their emphasis to the “Foster Parents Program”. (Throughout the organization’s history they have assisted Aid to Scouting, General Child Welfare and a program working with the FBI fighting juvenile delinquency with the “Keys in the Car” project.)

In 1981, the association created National Associations, The Active 20-30/U.S. & Canada, Inc. was created. The International Charity did nothing for sometime, so in 1989 our National association created the “Active 20-30 Foundation, Inc.”

We do not support any particular charity on the National level except for maybe the National Association for the Prevention of Child Abuse.

So to re-educate all the members (and I’m sure many of our clubs have never seen the Can), we have sent new cans for your use. “That’s all we ask – a penny-a-day for the kids”. Assign the responsibility of passing the can to your Sgt-of-Arms.

Your National Board of Trustees for the Foundation has made it a goal to collect enough funds to equal the amount of members we have in the association. That could amount to about $6,000. In the history of our association, we have yet to achieve that goal. Wouldn’t it be a great testimony to have that amount collected at the National Convention?

The funds received go into a restricted account in the Active 20-30 Foundation. These funds are not used for general operating expenses. Our intent is to build up enough money to live off the interest. Thereby, we could begin distributing funds to child welfare projects on a national basis or even to our clubs as a matching grant program.

So, get to work! Past that can! We hope every club is sending a delegate to the National Convention in Portland where each club will make a presentation of funds at the General Meeting.

Yes, we pay dues. Yes, we pay for meals at our meetings. And, yes, we give our sweat to making our projects successful but this is a way for each member to directly give to charity – for just $3.65 for the year. Here is one tradition that binds all of our clubs together.

(The Active Twenty-Thirtian, 1992, p3)

pennies

 

Keith H Hall’s 1954 Speech

The gentleman on the right (in the white shirt) is Keith H Hall. He was a President of the Active Club of Sacramento in 1953. The next year, 1954, he participated in the Public Speaking Contest for his district but did not win. He did, however, get elected as Lieutenant Governor for District 6.

One of our objectives is leadership, and what better way to work on that then through self development with Public Speaking. It seems that each year, there was a list of topics they could pick from, and then deliver in a speech contest. Below is the speech that Mr. Hall gave during the District 6 Convention.

 

 

Topic Sentence:
Active International in order to succeed in its conquest for permanent growth and expansion needs a powerful secret weapon.

Body:
If Active Club is to achieve its deserved place in the orbit of other great international service clubs, we had better stop right here and now and analyze our present position and design a plan to ensure that we arrive at our destination.

The course we are now following is apparent. The stronger clubs are increasing our membership by chartering new clubs, but the weaker clubs are offsetting this growth by losing members faster than their big brothers can charter. Now the conclusion to this cycle is obvious. But this need not be.

No solvent establishment sets its sights on a single period, but rather aims at the horizon of the years ahead. That is why I suggest that the International resolve itself to a long range, three-year plan.

The first (1) year dedicated to the bolstering of the membership of the existing clubs.

The second (2) to the exploiting of the service and welfare to the communities of those same existing clubs.

The third (3) to the expanding of Active International to the far corners of our unlimited boundaries.

Now let’s take a look at these yearly plans separately. First, I say we must strengthen our existing clubs. From the reports I have seen there are very few clubs that have such enormous memberships that it renders them unwieldy. But rather I would say that the truth is just about the opposite. If we are to succeed in adding more stories to our International edifice, it might be wise to check our foundations first. Some of it may be in need of repairs by now.

A leaning tower of Active Clubs, might provide a curious interest to a touring prospective member but to what purpose could it serve him? Once we are sure that we have our foundations in good order, and enough reinforcing steel, the sky’s the limit.

Now after we have accomplished our first goal we can turn confidently to the next. The purpose of the 2nd year is to harness this new-found energy and direct it to the main objectives for the welfare of its community and the progress of its members. The staging of local and international welfare projects will sink our roots deeper in those same existing communities. Then and only after we have accomplished our first 2 goals do we turn our sights to the expanding of ideas to the new surrounding communities.

Then we shall find that with this added manpower and new-born energy we can and will charter bigger and stronger clubs. For if we build carefully, slowly, and painstakingly we will have found our secret weapon for success.

Then in the using of this modern weapon in these modern times, we will no longer just be ACTIVE but radioactive. And in a correct, logical sequence we shall set off a contagious chain reaction, that will discharge a perpetual energy in forms of enthusiasm, progress, and goodwill.

And we shall let the “Geiger counters” of public opinion, our own progress, growth and expansion be the measurer of our success.

I thank you.

(Thank you to the family of Keith H Hall for the donated items).

You can read about his life here: https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/fair-oaks-ca/keith-hall-5358104

THE MAGAZINE (or evolution of)

I’ve been wanting to share a little of the evolution of the Active 20-30 publication. These right now are just the magazine covers of the changes through the years. I’m hoping to dig deeper and find articles within talking about the changes. As you will see; as the organization’s name changes and two groups merge, so did their magazines.

Active 20-30 Club, United States and Canada association has in their current bylaws a section for our official publication.

Article XII [Official Publication]
Section 1. Publication and Title: The association shall publish, or cause to be published under its control, a periodical under the official title of “Active Twenty-Thirtian

There are a couple more sections detailing the editorial staff, subscriptions, and club correspondents. I am not highlighting those areas at the moment so we’ll leave them be.The first couple of the 20-30 magazines were more like bulletins of clubs and events and what occurred. This was the first cover for the Association of 20-30 Clubs (1927).  Recap: this is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Sacramento, California.This is the first cover for the Active Club (1928) Recap: This is the group of 20 to 30 year olds that started out in Aberdeen, Washington.Next, we have the magazine cover when 20-30 International and Active International merged together into one organization (1960s).Lastly, a couple more when they became smaller publications after International split into different national association groups. These represent the United States and Canada’s magazine. Couldn’t find any International ones at the time of this posting.

The First 5 Conventions of 20-30

Here’s a little tidbit from the 20-30 history files

The first year the Association of 20-30 Clubs (as the Active 20-30 was then known) started having convention meetings was December 11, 1926 in Sacramento, California. About 15 members from 7 clubs attended. At that meeting, they approved and welcomed the 8th club into the Association, which was Reno, Nevada. The first club formed out of the state of California.

1927 had 3 more convention meetings held for the Association of 20-30 clubs to get together and members could have a merry time and approve more clubs into it’s organization. Here’s a brief note of those conventions:

April 9-10, 1927 – Second convention meeting held in San Bernardino, California

– Resolution was introduced by San Bernardino which proposed the division of the member clubs into district groups.

– Standard Constitution for member clubs was adopted

August 13-14, 1927 – Third convention meeting held in Reno, Nevada

– Changes made in the Association’s constitution and By-Laws, a brief outline of which follows: New delegates will be elected and will meet on the second Saturday of next December. Thereafter an annual convention will be held between the 15th of August and the 15th of September each year. The elected officers of the Association will be a President, Vice-President, and Secretary-Treasurer. Immediately after his election, the President shall divide the territory embraced by the Association into districts and shall appoint a District Governor to supervise club activities in each district, they to serve at the pleasure of the President.

– The Twenty-Thirtian was authorized as the official publication of the Association, with Ed Cain appointed as Editor. It will be published monthly and one copy will be sent to each club for each active member on its rolls.

December 10, 1927 – Fourth convention meeting held in Fresno, California

– By the time of this convention meeting, 18 clubs had been formed and accepted into the organization. And about 100 members attended this convention. Quite a difference from the 15 at the first one.

August 1928 – Fifth convention meeting held in Stockton, California

Active International: A Brief Outline Covering First Years in History

By Carl C Springer
Founder of the Active Club

The first meeting of the Active Club was heald at the Sweet Shop in Aberdeen, Wash., on February 10, 1922. Those present were Paul Arthaud, Ernest Axland, Cal Teman, Pat McNamara, Edgar Jones, and Carl Springer. The latter was named temporary chairman and Ernest Axland temporary secretary.

At the second session in the Washington Hotel of the same city the same group was present along with Carl Morck, Clarence George, Tom O’Hara, Earl Woodland, Gordon Tebb, FK Green, LA Aldrich, Vard Steiglitz, Carl Weathrwax Jr., Dr. Harry Tyo and Frank Partridge. A constitution and by-laws committee was appointed.

The third session was held at the same place. At this time the constitution and by-laws were adopted and the following officers were elected: EC Axland, chairman; Carl C Springer, timekeeper. Several names were presented for an appropriate title for the organization and Carl Morck proposed the word “Active” which was adopted on motion.

Meetings were continued in the same manner until the constitution and by-laws were revised on Jan. 3, 1924. At this time the former titles were dropped in recognition of president, vice-president, and secretary. Carl Springer was named president of the club; Charles J Kalb, vice-president, and Arthur J Spacek, secretary. The constitution recognizing the organization as a national was filed with the secretary of the state on August 20, 1924.

The group was incorporated under the laws of Washington. Hoquiam group No. 2 was granted a charter presented by Herbert Wilson, president of the Aberdeen Club. Montesano became No. 3 as chartered by the present international treasurer, Ed Nattrass, who was the vice-president of the Aberdeen Active Club.

Soon after Elma became No. 4 and Olympia No. 5. During the early days in the organization several activities were entered into by the Aberdeen group. They sponsored joint banquets with the other service clubs and the Chamber of Commerce, helped in establishment of a tourist park and Boy Scout Camp, sponsored a kid’s day, and were active in Near East relief work. Many other smaller tasks were accomplished by the organization.

This includes a general outline of the Active Club up until the time of the first convention held in Montesano, 1925, when the present constitution and by-laws were adopted and new officers elected for the International. A new charter also was received from the secretary of state.

Following this time the rapid expansion of the club started. This history of the organization from this time to the present is generally know to the membership of the international.

(1927)

Bob Hope Entertains Banning

by Don “Louie” Keele

An Tuesday night, February 24, millions of listeners throughout the North American continent and probably some overseas, heard about Banning and its 20-30 Club. Bob Hope brought his program to Banning to help our club secure money for its Building Fund.

In addition to his regular broadcast, Bob did a special hour show after leaving the air. Vera Vague, Jerry Colona, guest star Clifton Webb and announcer Wendell Niles were the principal performers. Les Brown and his orchestra were generous with their fine music.

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President Milton Callopy presented the comedian with a blue and grey western shirt bearing the inscription “Healthy Baskers” in gold lettering. This is the name our club is known by.

Bob Hope made presentations of gold football trophies to the outstanding football players of the Banning High School football squad of 1947 on behalf of our club.

Community leaders have expressed their appreciation of the work of our club in bringing the Hope show to Banning, and stated it was one of the best publicity features the community has ever had. Every seat in the auditorium was occupied and the entire event was outstanding.